Tag Archives: tony phillips derby

Troubleshooting “this site has not been shared with you”

I’m often asked to solve permission errors in SharePoint. It’s not hard to do with the tools available in SharePoint, you don’t even have to know much about AD especially if you use SharePoint groups.

Ways to permission a SharePoint site:

  • Permission directly against the user – not recommended as a lot of maintenance required when someone joins or leaves the organisation.
  • Use SharePoint Groups – SharePoint groups allow you to manage users within the SharePoint interface, they can be reused all over the site collection
  • Active Directory Security Groups – AD groups might already exist on your domain, these can be used but be aware that SharePoint 2013 caches the membership of these groups for around 2 hours and when using Office 365, DirSync will need to run to replicate these groups in the cloud.

What can be permissioned in SharePoint?

  • Sites – entire subsites
  • Lists – individual lists and libraries such as a document library
  • Folders – folders within a library
  • Items – items within a list or library

SharePoint permissions flow down the site from the root of the site collection unless otherwise changed. If permissions are changed at any level, any items below it will inherit the changed permissions.

SharePoint has a very easy way to check permissions of an individual user, check out my video below on how to use it.



How to create a basic content type

I’ve just created a video guide on creating a simple content type and attaching it to a document library.

You can add custom metadata to a SharePoint list by:

  • Adding columns directly onto the list
  • Using Site Columns (can be reused with other lists)
  • Content Types (can be reused and keeps a set of custom columns together in a content type)

If you decide to use a content type, you will also get the benefits of being able to apply a workflow to the content type (rather than to each list individually). If you are thinking of developing search, content types can be a great way to filter and search for specific types of data in a list. You can also use multiple content types in a list (each with different columns), for example an invoice and a receipt.



Looping through all subsites in SharePoint Online

SharePoint Online requires use of the Client Object model when modifying the site via PowerShell due to there being no backend server exposed in Office 365. Users with previous experience of using JavaScript Client Object model will find this a familiar method.

In the example below, the Powershell iterates through all subsites (and subsites of subsites) in a site collection or root site. This could be used for disabling a web scoped feature or automating site modification.

First of all, the variables are initiated including the path to the relevant DLLs.

#connection variables and reference DLL
$username = "user@onmicrosoft.com"
$password = "Password123"
$SiteCollectionUrl = "https://tonyishere.sharepoint.com"
Add-Type -Path "c:\Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.dll"

A new object for the client context requires creating, this can be done in a reusable function as shown below.

# Generate ClientContext function so we can reuse
function GetClientContext($SiteCollectionUrl, $username, $password) {
     $securePassword = ConvertTo-SecureString $password -AsPlainText -Force
     $context = New-Object Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.ClientContext($SiteCollectionUrl) 
     $credentials = New-Object Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.SharePointOnlineCredentials($username, $securePassword) 
     $context.Credentials = $credentials
     return $context
}

The following function has a nested call to call itself, this enables it to iterate through subsites of subsites. Without the nested function call, it would only cover a single subsite depth. The function writes the url of the site to the screen but this could be replaced with more complex functionality such as enabling a feature or creating a list item.

# function to loop through subsites
function catchsubsites ($subsiteurl){
	$clientContext = GetClientContext $subsiteurl $username $password
	$rootWeb = $clientContext.Web
	$childWebs = $rootWeb.Webs
	$clientContext.Load($rootWeb)
	$clientContext.Load($childWebs)
	$clientContext.ExecuteQuery()
	#do something on top level site
	write-host $rootWeb.url -ForegroundColor Yellow
	foreach ($childWeb in $childWebs)
	{
		#do something for each subsite
		write-host $childWeb.url -ForegroundColor Yellow
		#see if there are any subsites beneath this and loop all of them too
		catchsubsites $childWeb.url
	}
}

Finally the function is called to kick off the whole process of looping through the site.

#Finally run the function to get it all started!
catchsubsites $SiteCollectionUrl

This example could be refined so that it doesn’t authenticate at every request but it does show how simple it can be to create the complex PowerShell scripts that we are all used to using on SharePoint on-premises in the cloud version of Microsoft’s Office 365 SharePoint Online.

Update: Code updated 01/10/2016, fixed variable in loop and added section to run code for parent site

List subsites using the JavaScript client object model in SharePoint 2013

SharePoint Office 365 Site Creation JavaScript

To do this, use the script editor web part or the page viewer web part (and put the HTML file in a document library).

To start off, setup the HTML to include jQuery and sp.js (see below).

SP.SOD.executeFunc('sp.js', 'SP.ClientContext', function () {
 //alert('loaded');
});

JQuery functions are used to populate HTML containers on the page.

<div id="tonycontent">
	<!-- Dashboard -->
	<div id="tonydashboard" class="tonycontenttable">
	</div>
</div>

The first function loads the current site. The get_current function returns the current context of the user from which the subsites can be retrieved (see below).

function getSubWebs(){
	clientContext = new SP.ClientContext.get_current();
	web = clientContext.get_web();
    	webCollection = web.getSubwebsForCurrentUser(null);
    	clientContext.load(webCollection);
    	clientContext.executeQueryAsync(onGetSubwebsSuccess, onGetSubwebsFail);
}

If the query is successful it will load the onGetSubwebsSuccess function, otherwise it will run onGetSubwebsFail function.

In the success function, the webCollection variable is looped through to retrieve the URL and the title of each subsite. JQuery functions are then used to append the HTML containers.

function onGetSubwebsSuccess(sender, args){
	jQuery("#tonydashboard").empty();
	var html4 ="<div class='tonycontenttablerow'><div class='tonycontenttabletitle'>Site Name</div><div class='tonycontenttabletitle'>Site URL</div></div>";
	jQuery("#tonydashboard").append(html4);
    var webEnumerator = webCollection.getEnumerator();	
    while (webEnumerator.moveNext()){
        var web = webEnumerator.get_current();
		var webtitle = web.get_title();
		var weburl = web.get_serverRelativeUrl();
        var html3="<div class='tonycontenttablerow'><div class='tonycontenttablecolumn'>" + webtitle + "</div><div class='tonycontenttablecolumn'>" + weburl + "</div></div>";
		jQuery("#tonydashboard").append(html3);
    }
}

Download the full code here

The client object model can also be used to create subsites from templates, permission sites, create lists and much more! This method works on both 365 SharePoint Online and SharePoint 2010 and SharePoint 2013 on-premises.

SharePoint 2013 JavaScript Client Object Model

Using document templates in SharePoint (365 and on premise)

Document Library Templates

Each content type in a document library can be assigned an individual document templates. In the document library below, two different content types have been added, each with a different template.

Tony is here

To edit the word templates, open the site in SharePoint designer 2013.

SharePoint Designer

Open the document library.

SharePoint Designer

In the content types section, open the content type (in this case it is called Policy).

Content Types

In the ribbon select “Edit Document Template”.

Edit Template

This will allow you to create a dotx document which will be the template for this particular content type in this library. Once the template has been saved, it will be available as the main template for the content type.

Select Document

When users create a document using the Policy content type from the new menu, it will prompt them to enter a name for the new document.

Name Document

Please note that currently, the new templates will only open in Office Web Apps (online) if using Internet Explorer. Other browsers will prompt to open in the client application.

Office web Apps online