Tag Archives: SharePoint Tony

Using SharePoint Groups

What is a SharePoint group?

A SharePoint group is a group of users which can be used to permission a site. Groups can be re-used around the site collection and can be used to permission, sites, lists, libraries, folders and items. Using SharePoint groups allows the administrator to control access without having to edit individual permissions, only the SharePoint group membership requires editing rather than each permission level.

Creating a SharePoint Group

Select “Site settings” from the SharePoint menu.

SharePoint Group Permissions

Select “People and Groups” from the “Users and Permissions” menu.

SharePoint Group Permissions

Select “Groups” on the left side menu, this will show a list of all the groups on the site collection.

SharePoint Group Permissions

Create a new group by selecting “New Group” from the “New” drop down menu.

SharePoint Group Permissions

Enter a name and description for the new group.

SharePoint Group Permissions

The Group owner has overall control of the group settings and members. This is usually either an administrator or someone you have delegated the running of the group to.

SharePoint Group Permissions

You can decide to keep the membership of the group private to the users in the group or let everyone see the group membership. There is also an option to allow group members to edit the membership of a group. This is great for collaborative sites where members may wish to share with others without having to go to the group owner. It helps remove some of the burden from the group owner and can open up sharing and collaboration without admin intervention.

SharePoint Group Permissions

Membership requests allow users who are not members of the group, the ability to request membership. This can be set to auto-accept which is useful for open groups or the requests can be sent to an email address for approval by the group owner (or members if this option was enabled earlier).

SharePoint Group Permissions

Permission levels can be set when creating the group. Please note that setting permissions here will only apply to the site which you are currently on. It is advised that you create the group without any permissions and then go back into the sites to add relevant permissions to avoid any confusion.

Click “Create” to finish setting up the group.

Adding members to the group

Once the group has been created, you may notice that the only member is the group owner. Additional users can be added by going to the “Add Users” option under the “New” menu.

SharePoint Group Permissions

Enter the name(s) of the members(s) you wish you add to the group. Under advanced options, you will see that the default setting is to send an email to any users added to the group. This is optional and can be deselected. In addition to this, you can customise the personal message in the email invitation for these users.

Note: Active Directory security groups can also be added here if using DirSync (in Office 365)

SharePoint Group Permissions

Click Share to add the users to the group.

Permissioning a site with a SharePoint Group

Once the group has been created, it can be used to permission subsites, lists, libraries, folders and even items. To give the group’s members permissions on a SharePoint site, first navigate to the SharePoint site itself.

Select “Site Settings” from the menu.

SharePoint Group Permissions

Select “Site permissions” from the “Users and Permissions” menu.

SharePoint Group Permissions

Select “Grant Permissions” from the “Permissions” tab.

SharePoint Group Permissions

As you start to type in the name of the group, SharePoint will pick up the group name.

SharePoint Group Permissions

Click “SHOW OPTIONS” to view the permission levels.

Select a permission level from the drop down and decide whether you would like to send an email to the group.

SharePoint Group Permissions

Avoid adding the group to another SharePoint group (this is usually the default option and can over complicate your permissions). Use one of the permission levels available:

  • Read – Can view the site but cannot edit any items or pages
  • Contribute – Can add, edit and delete list items. User cannot create new apps or sites.
  • Design – Users have contribute but in addition, they can also create and delete apps and subsites. Apply themes and designs.
  • Full Control – Users can do anything on the site including change permissions (usually admins only)

There are other permission levels, you can also specify your own. For a full reference of permission levels please see the Microsoft site:

Microsoft Office 365 Support – Permissions

How to create a basic content type

I’ve just created a video guide on creating a simple content type and attaching it to a document library.

You can add custom metadata to a SharePoint list by:

  • Adding columns directly onto the list
  • Using Site Columns (can be reused with other lists)
  • Content Types (can be reused and keeps a set of custom columns together in a content type)

If you decide to use a content type, you will also get the benefits of being able to apply a workflow to the content type (rather than to each list individually). If you are thinking of developing search, content types can be a great way to filter and search for specific types of data in a list. You can also use multiple content types in a list (each with different columns), for example an invoice and a receipt.



Selecting an Office 365 Business plan for the first time

Microsoft provide a nice comparison list of all the available 365 plans for business.

Click here to view the comparison table

However when planning to move to Office 365, you may not have considered the implications of initially choosing a particular plan. You may also have a number of different licences for different users in the organisation (you don’t have to stick to one plan). For example some users may need to download office on their machine (accountants using the full desktop version of Excel) and some may just need a mailbox. I briefly go over the different plans in the video below.



Remember that business licences are for users who don’t need centralised deployment and control. Small businesses may opt for the business licences while larger ones may need some compliance and centralised administration.

Just a quick note on upgrading licences for older tenancies using the Office 365 small business plan. I recently worked with a client using the old Small Business licences, they wanted to upgrade to enterprise but due to it being on the old 365 platform, it wasn’t possible to upgrade from within the admin centre. The only option to upgrade was to create a new tenancy, manually migrate PST files (exchange) and re-sync document libraries (SharePoint) up to the new tenancy using OneDrive for business sync tool. Very annoying and a lot of work! However all users on the new platform with Business licences can upgrade their licences in-place by going to the subscriptions page. I have also been informed by Microsoft that these older plans cannot be renewed after October 2015 and Microsoft will offer some migration options before the licences run out.

Using document templates in SharePoint (365 and on premise)

Document Library Templates

Each content type in a document library can be assigned an individual document templates. In the document library below, two different content types have been added, each with a different template.

Tony is here

To edit the word templates, open the site in SharePoint designer 2013.

SharePoint Designer

Open the document library.

SharePoint Designer

In the content types section, open the content type (in this case it is called Policy).

Content Types

In the ribbon select “Edit Document Template”.

Edit Template

This will allow you to create a dotx document which will be the template for this particular content type in this library. Once the template has been saved, it will be available as the main template for the content type.

Select Document

When users create a document using the Policy content type from the new menu, it will prompt them to enter a name for the new document.

Name Document

Please note that currently, the new templates will only open in Office Web Apps (online) if using Internet Explorer. Other browsers will prompt to open in the client application.

Office web Apps online

Fixing SharePoint 2010 dynamic menus on the iPad

When using an iPad with the default v4 Master Page in SharePoint 2010, the dynamic drop down menus do not function as expected. When using a mouse, a simple hover over the menu item will drop down the dynamic menu child items (as shown below).

SharePoint 2010 menu on ipad

When using an iPad, iPhone and most other smart phone/tablets device, there is no mouse and no hover over action. When clicking on the parent menu item, the user is taken to that link instead of showing the child items.

To solve this issue (partially), I created some jQuery code to allow the first tap to drop down the menu items and the second tap to take the user to the chosen page.

First I use the jQuery ready function to load my script when the page has fully loaded.

jQuery(document).ready(function() {
});

When the page has finished loading, the type of device needs to be detected. In the example below I have used the iPhone, iPad and iPod devices. There are alternative devices!

if((navigator.userAgent.match(/iPhone/i)) || (navigator.userAgent.match(/iPod/i)) || (navigator.userAgent.match(/iPad/i))) {
}

This solution involves using a counter to detect the first tap of a dynamic menu item as a hover over and the second tap as the actual click. First, set the counter to 0.

var countipad=0;

Another handy jQuery function is used to detect when a dynamic menu item is clicked. Using this class “dynamic-children” ensures that only the first click of a drop down menu is cancelled.

jQuery("a.dynamic-children").click(function() {
}

If the click is the first click, the default action (redirect) is prevented. The counter is then incremented ready for the next click.

if(countipad==0){
	event.preventDefault();
	countipad=countipad+1;
}

The full solution is as follows:

jQuery(document).ready(function() {
	if((navigator.userAgent.match(/iPhone/i)) || (navigator.userAgent.match(/iPod/i)) || (navigator.userAgent.match(/iPad/i))) {
		var countipad=0;
 		jQuery("a.dynamic-children").click(function() {
			if(countipad==0){
				event.preventDefault();
				countipad=countipad+1;
			}
		});
	}
});

This isn’t a great solution as the second click will always take you to the link. A better solution would detect which link is selected and only redirect on the second click of that particular menu item.

ipad menu SharePoint 2010

Design Manager in SharePoint 2013

There are a number of options available for visual designers and information architects. One of the great new features in SharePoint 2013 is the Design Manager. You can locate this by going to the settings menu and selecting “Design Manager”

Screen 1

Design Manager is a series of pages and links to take you to the design libraries similar to those found in SharePoint 2010. From welcome page you can import wsp packaged designs or pick from a pre-installed master page.

Screen 3

“Manage Device Channels” is a new feature which allows you to change the look and feel of a site based on the client’s device or browser. This is great for optimising the rendering of the page in mobile devices.

Screen 4

The “Upload Design Files” is a link to the _catalogs folder which was also used in SharePoint 2010 and MOSS to store the Master Pages. It recommends that this is mapped as a network drive.

Screen 5

“Editing Master Pages” is a link to the _catalogs folder which was also used in SharePoint 2010 and MOSS to store the Master Pages.

screen 6

“Edit Design Templates” is another new feature in SharePoint 2013. It allows customisation of the way content is displayed. This might be used to customise search results by defining fields but also presentation. More information can be found here http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj163942%28v=office.15%29.aspx

screen 7

“Edit Page Layouts” is another shortcut to a library which was also used in SharePoint 2010 and MOSS. It displays the page layout content types from the master page gallery.

screen 8

The page shown below reminds the designer to publish all of the files before applying the design to the site. A handy link to apply the Master Page is provided.

Create design package allows the design to be exported and used on other sites. This is really useful for taking a design from a development environment to the live site. To create this package previously would have required creating a solution or feature in Visual Studio and deploying it to the server or site collection. This is a handy tool to do this for you.

All of the features below are described in more detail on Microsoft’s site.
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj163942%28v=office.15%29.aspx

While the design manager is more of a guide than somewhere an experienced designer will actually upload there designs to (SharePoint Designer will be the main tool), it does make the design process clearer and provides some neat tools for the new functionality about to be released in Microsoft SharePoint 2013.

SharePoint 2013 Design Manager