Tag Archives: Microsoft Forms

3 essential resources for educators and school leaders

In this podcast episode, we spoke to Microsoft specialist and TweetMeet lead Marjolein Hoekstra about her journey with Microsoft, TweetMeets, MVPs, MSEduCentral and much more.

She reveals three must-have resources designed especially for educators and school leaders.

Marjolein first became connected with Microsoft after diving deep into OneNote and designing an example of what features she thought OneNote should have.

“I wanted to tell them about my desires for OneNote and they were so impressed with my ideas that they asked me if I wanted to become a Microsoft Most Valuable Professional. Of course, I was honoured,” says Marjolein.

“It was around this time I discovered how often OneNote is used in education, and I started to focus my efforts to showcase features of OneNote to educators and get involved in the Microsoft Education community.”




Microsoft asked Marjolein if she would like to organise TweetMeets for Microsoft educators, which she ran successfully until 2020 and has recently started back up in 2022.

“TweetMeets are a multi-lingual conversation on Twitter between educators globally. It takes place once a month and focuses on a certain topic. For example, previous TweetMeets have discussed equity and inclusion, hybrid learning and reading fluency and literacy,” explains Marjolein.

“Every TweetMeet is led by different hosts, who are experts in that month’s topic. It’s a chance to find like-minded people from around the world and connect with other educators and school leaders.”

You can find details about the next TweetMeet via the TweetMeet Twitter account.

Marjolein has also been building a spreadsheet of ‘Frequent Edu Links for Educators‘, which is a compilation of resources centred around certain topics or Microsoft products, especially for educators.

“We have topics for multiple different products used within Microsoft education. Teams plays a major role in this because it’s the underpinning platform for so many tools nowadays, but we have resources on Microsoft Edge, Whiteboard and other tools in the Microsoft suite,” Marjolein describes.

“The spreadsheet lives in your browser, so you can open this whenever you need to and share it with others.”

Microsoft Frequent Edu Links screenshot

The spreadsheet currently has a collection of 1,300+ resources that Marjolein and her team have been collecting over the past year and a half.

“We intend to keep updating the spreadsheet and we listen to feedback from users so that we can decide which resources to include,” she continues.

The third resource Marjolein talks about is the Daily Microsoft Ed Tech Newsfeed.

“This is basically a news page with blog posts, tweets, videos and other resources from Microsoft Education. It’s a mixed bag of the latest resources that could be of interest to educators,” says Marjolein.

“We also include announcements from the Office 365 IT Admin centre, so educators who are a bit more technically inclined can prepare themselves for what’s coming in the near future.”

Daily Microsoft EdTech News screenshot

Remember, Cloud Design Box also has an extensive library of resources focusing on Microsoft 365, SharePoint and Teams for education. Access all of our videos, podcasts, blogs, guides and more here.

Lost learning – How teachers can identify gaps in learning with Microsoft Forms

Microsoft Forms can help teachers to identify gaps in learning and keep track of students’ progress on specific topics.  

Over the last few years, many students have inevitably lost hours of learning due to higher absences, adjusting to learning from home and dealing with abrupt changes in restrictions.   

On top of this, some individuals have struggled to access learning remotely due to a lack of access to devices or internet connectivity.   

This major disruption has caused a huge problem for schools as teachers battle to clearly identify gaps in individual students’ learning and keep track of progress. 

In Forms, we can quickly create quizzes and surveys to gauge how confident students are feeling about specific topics.  

Forms are a great tool to use when catching up on lost learning because teachers can: 

  • Easily duplicate and reuse forms – which saves teacher time as it removes the need to create new forms for each class and they can be shared within departments or across the entire school. 
  • Quickly create engaging surveys with a range of options and tools.  
  • View data, graphs and charts on individual students or whole classes – so you know exactly who needs more support with a specific topic.  
  • Download raw data in Excel for records and in-depth analysis.  

Here’s how to create a quiz in Microsoft Forms to tackle to problem of lost learning:  



  

Create a quiz in Microsoft Forms. 

  1. Select New quiz to create a new quiz. From here, you can add a title and description.

Create a new quiz in Microsoft Forms

Tip: Create a template quiz that can be reused for all your classes. 

2. Select Add new to add a question. You can pick from either Choice, Text, Rating and Date. Or, alternatively, select the down arrow to bring up advanced question options like Ranking, Likert scale or File upload.  

Add a question to a Microsoft Form

You can be as creative as you like, but to create a form for the purpose of addressing lost learning, we’d recommend using the Choice, Text and Rating questions to effectively gauge students understanding of a topic.  

Add a Choice question to your Microsoft Form.  

Choice questions are versatile and can allow students to communicate their understanding of a topic or be set up as a comprehension task with right/wrong answers.  

  1. Select Add new and then Choice to add either a multiple or single choice question to your quiz.  
  2. From here, you can type out your question and add different options.  
  3. Choose whether it’s multiple or single choice by toggling on/off Multiple answers.
  4. Toggle on/off Required to decide whether students are required to fill out this question or not (we’d recommend selecting required if you want all students to answer a question as they may skip it).
  5. Add a subtitle for extra context by selecting the three dots (…) and then Subtitle. 

Add a choice question to a Microsoft Form

Add a Rating question to your Microsoft Form. 

Rating questions allow students to rate their understanding of a topic.  

  1. Select Add new and then Rating.  
  2. From here, you can type out your question.  
  3. Select how many rating levels you would like from the drop-down menu.  
  4. You can also choose whether to use numbers or stars from the Symbol drop-down menu.  
  5. Toggle on/off Required to decide whether students are required to fill out this question or not (we’d recommend selecting required if you want all students to answer a question as they may skip it). 
  6. Add a subtitle for extra context by selecting the three dots (…) and then Subtitle. 
  7. Add labels to the rating scale (I.e. 1 = Not confident at all and 5 = Completely confident) by selecting the three dots (…) and then Label. 

Add a rating scale to a Microsoft Form

Add a Text question to your Microsoft Form. 

Text questions give students space to write their own answers, instead of relying on pre-written answers.  

  1. Select Add new and then Text. 
  2. From here, you can type out your question. You can also add an image or video to support your question.  
  3. You can choose how much space a student gets to answer the question by toggling on/off Long answer.
  4. Toggle on/off Required to decide whether students are required to fill out this question or not (we’d recommend selecting required if you want all students to answer a question as they may skip it).
  5. Add a subtitle for extra context by selecting the three dots (…) and then Subtitle. 

Add a text question to a quiz

Change the theme of a Microsoft Form. 

To make your quiz look more visually appealing, you can change its theme. 

  1. Select Theme to open up the theme options. 
  2. Choose from a pre-set theme or customise your own theme with a specific colour or image.

Change the theme of a Microsoft Form

Change the settings of a Microsoft Form. 

  1. Select the three dots (…) in the top navigation bar of Microsoft Forms.  
  2. Here you can alter the settings of your quiz, for example, whether you wish to show results automatically, who can fill out the form and options for responses. 

Change the settings of a Microsoft Form

Share a Microsoft Form with your class.  

  1. Select Share in the top navigation bar of Microsoft Forms. 
  2. From here, you can create a link to your form to share your response. 
  3. You can also share the form as a template, which is great if you want to use the quiz across multiple classes or share it with colleagues for reuse.  
  4. Forms can also be collaborated on – you can create a link to your form for colleagues to view and edit.  

How to share your Microsoft Form

Here’s an example of how you can get your class to fill out the quiz: 

Announcing your form on Microsoft Teams

Once students start to fill out the quiz, you can see their answers in the Responses tab on the form.  

Here you can see an overview of everyone’s responses: 

View a summary of form responses 

Or, alternatively, you can click through to each individual student to see their responses and even how long it took them to fill out the quiz.   

Finally, you can export the data to Excel – which is great for combining with school-wide data and creating in-depth reports.  

Microsoft Forms is a brilliant tool for creating quizzes and surveys that can quickly identify gaps in student learning.

If you would like to find out more about how Microsoft 365 and Cloud Box can help your school or trust overcome the challenges of lost learning, book a demo with a member of our team.

How to get students more engaged outside of the classroom

Getting students engaged outside of the classroom can be difficult. While most students understand that they must complete homework and assignments for their classes, creating homework assignments that are engaging helps to reinforce learning and development.  

Below, we have some ideas on how you can use some of the tools in Microsoft 365, Teams and SharePoint to create brilliant and effective homework assignments.  

Use the Reading Progress tool. 

The Reading Progress tool in Microsoft Teams is a great way to liven up reading tasks, comprehension and language learning.  

Students can record video or audio of themselves reading a passage and submit it to their teachers for feedback or grading.  

What’s more, Microsoft picks up on any mispronunciations, omissions and repetitions – which is great for saving teacher time when marking.  

Students are also likely to feel more comfortable reading a passage in their own home, rather than aloud in front of their classmates.  

Grading a reading progress assignment in Microsoft Teams

Add audio clips into Class Notebooks and Assignments. 

It’s easy to add audio clips into Class Notebook and we know that some teachers have been using this feature to set learning objectives and instructions for homework tasks.  

Not only does this save the teacher time, but it also injects a bit of life into homework tasks.  

A new feature in Teams allows you to add video instructions directly to Assignments, while students can submit videos of themselves speaking a new language, practising a presentation, reading a passage or playing an instrument. 

Create revision videos that can be used again and again. 

Video is a great way to engage your students outside of the classroom as it’s a lot more engaging than sending over blocks of text and worksheets to revise from.  

You could keep a library of revision videos in SharePoint for your classes to access, or even embed videos into Class Notebook to compliment revision guides.  

As an additional bonus, when it comes to the end of the year, you can reuse the content you’ve created for your new classes – so there’s no duplication in work.

Get creative with whiteboards for assignments. 

A relatively new feature to Assignments, the whiteboard allows you to integrate a virtual board into Assignment tasks.  

You could either assign a previously created whiteboard (i.e. one that you created during a lesson) or add a blank whiteboard with students to work on.  

Another great idea is to create a whiteboard where students fill in the blanks. It gives your class something different to do than work in Word or their Class Notebook.  

Attaching a whiteboard to assignments in Microsoft Teams Source: Microsoft Tech Community

Test knowledge with quizzes and forms. 

Quizzes and forms can be easily set up in Microsoft 365 and work great in and outside of the classroom.  

One idea is to use a form to quiz your students on their understanding of a previous lesson. Or, you could incorporate a quiz into a reading comprehension task.  

Not only are quizzes and forms more engaging than filling out a Word document, but it also gives you as a teacher an almost instant overview of whether the learning has been understood and what areas you may need to recap during the next lesson.  

onenote quiz

If you would like to learn more about how we can help your school or trust achieve more with Microsoft 365, please contact a member of our team today.

Improving Communication Across a Multi Academy Trust with Microsoft 365 at PolyMAT

In this podcast episode on Microsoft 365 user adoption, we speak with Mark Guest, Director of Innovation at PolyMAT, a multi academy trust in Thamesmead and the surrounding areas.

Mark discusses how the trust uses SharePoint to improve communication across the schools and created dashboards with Microsoft Power Apps to save teacher time.

PolyMAT is a UK-based MAT made up of Woolwich Polytechnic School for Boys, one of the country’s largest boys’ secondary schools and its sister school Woolwich Polytechnic School for Girls.

Watch the full podcast episode here:



“My job as Director of Innovation has so many facets to it. I focus on how we can make the most of data, systems and technology in our schools to become more efficient and ensure we’re getting value for money,” Mark tells us.

PolyMAT has been working with Cloud Design Box since 2020, and they have created staff collaboration sites in SharePoint for each of the schools, plus the main one for the trust as a whole.

“Each page follows a consistent layout and includes relevant news, a calendar, announcements, Quick Links to things like policies, a class cover manager and information about room changes that are all pulled from SIMS,” Mark explains.

“We’ve also got an area where staff can ask questions and share feedback directly to the trust leadership team.”

The three calendars – one for the boys’ school, the girls’ school and trust are synced using Power Automate so that they always contain the correct, up-to-date information.

Staff can easily send out a quick announcement by filling out a form and selecting a target audience – this allows them to publish the information onto SharePoint and have the option to send an email to the right people.

“We’ve created a Senior Leadership Team (SLT) app that teachers can download to their phones. They’ll receive push notifications if a student is removed from a lesson or SLT is required.”

PolyMAT is also taking advantage of the endless possibilities of Power BI dashboards.

“Our various dashboards can be embedded into SharePoint and save teachers loads of time when they need to access information about their students quickly,” he shows us.

“An example is our Tutor Reports – they show things like attendance and punctuality, as well as the number of students who are off due to self-isolation and therefore need work to be provided while they’re learning from home.”

A specific example of the technology reducing admin time for teachers is gathering information about a particular student:

“A Head of Year may need to know who teachers an individual student. This job would typically take around 10-15 minutes to complete. Now, they simply bring up a student profile and can get the information in a couple of minutes.”

PolyMAT is committed to training and continuous development, always seeking feedback and helping teachers use the tools to save time and get back to teaching.

“Regular training is available, and we’ve got a long term plan to increase efficiency even further. For example, bring all our Power Apps into one place and relocating our resources in centralised document libraries that will get shared across the schools and trust,” he adds.

“As the trust grows and more schools join, we need to make sure that they have the same setup. During the pandemic, we’ve had a massive increase in using Teams and Microsoft 365, but if we don’t have structures in place and a long-term strategy, we won’t be able to sustain that level of usage. So we’re working with Cloud Design Box on a five-year plan to make sure we make the most out of this technology.”

If you would like to learn more about how we can help your school or trust, please contact a member of our team today.

Policy Acknowledgement Receipt using Microsoft Forms

It’s important to keep track and evidence who has read policy documents in any organisation or school.

Below, we have created a video on how you can quickly and easily create a policy acknowledgement receipt using Microsoft Forms.



Assign Self-marking Quizzes in Microsoft Teams for Education

Microsoft Forms quizzes can now be assigned to students in Microsoft Teams for education. These are auto-marked and the results are fed automatically into the teachers markbook. Find out how to use this new functionality in the video below.



You can find out more about how we can integrate Microsoft Teams, SharePoint and Class Notebook into an easy-to-navigate class dashboard by visiting the Cloud Design Box website.

Cloud Design Box Class Dashboard

Microsoft Teams for Education Summer 2018 Update

There’s a real buzz around Microsoft Teams. Microsoft have been increasing the momentum by releasing updates to improve the class collaboration tool recently. In this post I’m going to look at some of the updates already released and some coming very soon. You can find out more about the future updates here: Microsoft Education Blog.



Assigning to multiple classes

Sometimes teachers set the same assignment to multiple groups. This is now possible when setting an assignment in Teams. Just click the team name and select additional classes.

Microsoft Teams Class Selector

Tailoring assignments for individual students

Individual learning needs means that teachers sometimes have to set different assignments to students in the same class. Microsoft Teams now allows this using the student drop-down so teachers can assign different assignments to different groups of students within the same class.

Select individual students

Scheduling assignments and planning ahead

Teachers can now plan ahead by scheduling assignments. The assignment is only published to the student on the scheduled date allowing the teacher to set assignments for the whole month, term or even year in advance!

Schedule Assignments

Auto-marking Quizzes

Microsoft Forms will soon be integrated much tighter with Teams. Currently you can use Microsoft Forms to create quizzes and embed them in Class Notebooks or share the link for the assignment resource. This new integration will feed quiz results straight into the Microsoft Teams mark book. It will be really easy to create self-marking quizzes for students.

Microsoft Teams using Microsoft Forms Quiz

Summer Rollover

A question that has come up a lot recently has been “What will happen to my old class teams after year rollover?”. Microsoft have now answered this by archiving old class teams. These teams will be available in read-only mode, so you can still access your resources and work. The membership of these classes will not be updated post-rollover as the classes will no longer exist in the school’s MIS.

Class Dashboard and Class Cards

At Cloud Design Box, we create a seamless user-friendly environment for students and teachers to navigate between SharePoint, Teams and Class Notebook. To find out more, you can sign-up for one of our free webinars by clicking here. You can find out more about our products on the Cloud Design Box website.

Creating a quiz using Microsoft Forms in OneNote

Microsoft Forms are a great way to quickly gather survey results or produce quizzes. It could be testing employees on health and safety in OneNote or it could be setting students a topic quiz in Class Notebook.

In this post, I’m going to go through the steps on how to add a quiz to OneNote.

First, create a new page and call it “Quiz”.

Class Notebook

Go to the insert tab in the ribbon and select “Forms”.

Microsoft Forms

Here you will see a list of any forms and quizzes that you previously created in addition to the new options.

List of forms

Click “New Quiz”.

Microsoft Forms will open in a new tab, give the quiz a title and description.

Click “Add question” and select “Choice”.

Enter a question and all the options, you can press “Add option” to add more answer options.

Next to each answer option, you can provide some feedback for users who select this option using the speech bubble icon (see highlighted below).

Mark the correct answer by selecting the tick icon (see highlighted below).

At the bottom of the question, you can assign points for the correct answer, allow multiple answers and make it a required question.

By pressing the menu (…), you can bring up more options such as shuffling the answers or writing math equations.

You can add more questions by clicking “Add question”. The form will save automatically as you edit it (no save button).

When you have finished creating your quiz, switch the browser tab back to the OneNote file, you will see that the quiz has now appeared in the “My forms” list.

Press the “Insert” button.

Our quiz is now embedded on the page!

When users complete the quiz, they will see their points after pressing submit (with feedback on each question).

The author of the quiz can go back into “Microsoft Forms” via the app launcher (see highlighted below).

They can then see a detailed breakdown of the results with the option to export to Excel.

Microsoft Forms can also be added to SharePoint pages, so you can enhance your intranet with surveys and quizzes!

Microsoft Forms is a great tool in the Office 365 package. By using this tool in your organisation, you could really improve engagement with users.

At Cloud Design Box, our solutions help schools and companies get the best out of SharePoint, Teams and OneNote.

More information on our education and business solutions can be found on our website.

Cloud Design Box Class Dashboard