Tag Archives: Digital Strategy

How to use Presenter Mode in a Microsoft Teams Meeting

Using Presenter Mode in a Microsoft Class Teams meeting gives teachers more control over their lesson. They have access to their presenter notes and all the usual Class Teams tools, plus additional presenter options.  

Presenter Mode is only available in the desktop application of Teams.  

 In this quick guide, we show you how to use Presenter Mode and get the most out of it for your next lesson.  

Setting up Presenter Mode in Microsoft Teams. 

Once the Teams meeting has started, select Share Content on the navigation bar. 

Share content in Presenter Mode for Class Teams

This opens up a menu where you can choose to share your entire desktop, specific windows, Microsoft Whiteboard or PowerPoint.  

Select Browse on the right-hand side to either Upload from my computer or OneDrive depending on where your PowerPoint is located.  

 Upload presentation from desktop into a Class Teams meeting

Once you select your PowerPoint, it opens up into the Class Teams meeting.  

Presenter tools in Class Teams. 

The full range of meeting tools, such as View Participants, Meeting Chat and the More Actions menu (…) are visible and you’re able to easily scroll back and forth between slides.  

View participants window is availlable in Presenter Mode z

There are also some additional options beneath your slide deck, including Go to slide, which allows you to bring up a grid of your slide deck and choose a specific slide you wish to present.  

Go to slide view in Presenter Mode

Meanwhile, under More actions (…), you can hide the presenter view from yourself so you don’t see your notes, just the slides.  

Hide presenter view in Presenter Mode 

A further option is to View slides in high contrastToggle this on to only view the images and text on your slides and remove any extra design elements or backgrounds. This won’t change the view for students, only teachers.  

View slides in high contrast in Presenter Mode

What do students see when teachers are using Presenter Mode? 

Students can scroll through the slide deck using the private viewing bar and then select Back to presenter to go back to the slide the teacher is currently on.  

This feature can be switched off by teachers by clicking the Eye icon. When disabled, a line appears across the Eye icon and students are unable to scroll through the slides while you’re teaching.  

Prevent participants from moving through shared presentation on their own

Playing video clips in Presenter Mode. 

There are two ways of showing video clips when in Presenter Mode:  

Videos in Class Teams Presenter Mode

One option is to embed a video into your presentation. This can be viewed by selecting the play button, which plays the video within the presentation.   

Note: This only works if students have the latest version of PowerPoint installed on their device.  

Secondly, you could include a video link. Clicking a link opens the video on a separate window.  

To show the video to your students within the lesson, you need to go back to the Share content button and select the window the video has opened in. 

If you’re using a two-screen setup, it will open on your other screen and in the same way, select Screen #1 or Screen #2, depending on which screen it has opened in.  

Note: You also need to toggle on Include computer sound for your students to hear the video.  

Watch a step-by-step guide on how to use presenter mode in class teams: 

If you would like to learn more about how we can help your school, please contact a member of our team today.



How To Turn Off The Chat Feature in Class Teams

The chat feature in Microsoft Teams is a useful tool that allows students to communicate with their teachers and peers during online lessons. However, there may be times where the chat feature isn’t necessary and is causing distractions during lesson time.

Similar to the mute feature on Teams, this can easily be controlled and turned off, enabling you to teach without any interruptions. 

There are two simple ways to turn off the chat function, this can be done before or during your online lesson:

Disable chat function in Class Teams before your lesson.

You can disable the chat function before your lesson starts through Meeting options. This can be accessed on the calendar entry for your meeting.

Meeting options is found under Details on the calendar entry. 

Disable chat function in Class Teams before your lesson.

When the Meeting options menu appears, you can disable the meeting chat, along with other options for your meeting, such as who can present and allowing your students to un-mute themselves. 

To turn off the chat feature, change the Allow meeting chat option from enabled to disabled. Make sure to click Save after – this disables the chat function and activates any other changes you’ve made. 

Turn off chat function in Class Teams before your lesson.

Your students are made aware that the chat function isn’t available in the chat window when the lesson starts. 

Turn off chat function in Class Teams before your lesson.

Disable chat function in Class Teams during your lesson.

Teachers can also disable the chat function during the lesson. This can be useful when you want to disable the chat during certain parts of your lesson. 

At the top of your screen, there are a few options that allow you to control your meeting. To disable the chat function, you need to select the more actions menu (…).

When the drop-down menu appears, select Meeting options

To turn off the chat feature, change the Allow meeting chat option from enabled to disabled. Make sure to click Save after – this disables the chat function and activates any other changes you’ve made. 

Disable chat function in Class Teams during your lesson.

Enable chat function in Class Teams during your lesson.

At some point during your lesson, you may want to turn on the chat function to allow your students to communicate again. This can be done the same way by selecting Meeting options and enabling Allow meeting chat

Enable chat function in Class Teams during your lesson.

Using Meeting options is a great way to control your lessons and prevent any distractions during lesson time. The simplicity of this process also allows you to quickly change these options during your lessons giving you the freedom to activate and deactivate at any time and allowing students to contribute and communicate at the right times to enhance their learning. 

Enable chat function in Class Teams during your lesson.

Watch our step-by-step video on how to turn off the chat feature in Class Teams:



How To Review and Lock Pages in Class Notebook

Locking a page within Class Notebook is important when marking and assessing work, to prevent the student from editing the document after its deadline. In this guide, we show you how to review students work in Class Notebook and how to lock a page to prevent further editing by a student.  

How to review pages within Class Notebook. 

Open Class Notebook in Teams and select Class Notebook. 

Choose Review student work to open a menu on the right-hand side of the page. Select the Notebook section where the page we need to review is stored.  

How To Review and Lock Pages in Class Notebook

Select the page you wish to review. The names of your students in the selected Class Team appear in alphabetical order. Simply choose the name of the student whose work you wish to review.   

How to review pages within Class Notebook. 

Select Insert to type any notes or add emojis and sticks.  

The Class Notebook is updated in real-time so students can log in and see comments as soon as they’re written.  

How to review pages within Class Notebook. 

How to lock pages within Class Notebook.

Once the assignment has been graded and returned to the student, the Notebook can be edited by the student. Teachers may wish to lock the page so further editing can not be carried out by the student.   

Open Class Notebook in Teams and select Class Notebook. 

Choose Review student work to open a menu on the right-hand side of the page. Select the Notebook section where the page we need to review is stored. E.g. “Homework” 

How to lock pages within Class Notebook.

Choose the page you wish to lock and then select the Page Locking button at the top of the right-hand side menu.  

How to lock pages within Class Notebook.

How to lock pages within Class Notebook.

A tickbox is revealed next to the students’ name. Select either “All students” to lock all student pages, or select individual students to lock specific student pages.  

A padlock appears alongside the students’ name to indicate the page has been locked. Select Apply to lock the page(s). The student can no longer edit the page. 

How to lock pages within Class Notebook. How to lock pages within Class Notebook.

 

How to unlock pages within Class Notebook.

Follow the same process as above, but uncheck the tick box next to the student’s name. Then select Apply to unlock the page(s).  

Note: When a page is locked for a student, teachers have full read and write access to the page.  

Watch a step-by-step guide on how to review and lock pages in Class Notebook:



How To Lock the Collaboration Section in a Class Notebook 

In this guide, we show you how to lock the collaboration section in a Class Notebook.  

The collaboration space in a Class Notebook is where all students can edit the same pages and work together on projects. After using it, teachers may wish to lock the section to prevent students from editing the page, or so that the work can be assessed.  

When you have finished using the collaboration space, select Class Notebook and choose Manage Notebooks. 

How To Lock the Collaboration Section in a Class Notebook 

Switch the Lock Collaboration Space toggle from unlocked to locked.  

How To Lock the Collaboration Section in a Class Notebook 

Teachers are still able to edit the collaboration space when it’s locked, however, students are denied editing rights.  

How To Lock the Collaboration Section in a Class Notebook 

Students are still able to use other areas within their own Class Notebook, such as the Homework and Class Notes tabs.  

There are a few options for what to do with a locked collaboration space:  

Teachers can move the locked collaboration space into the Content Library and distribute the page to their students’ Class NotebooksFor example, as a homework or revision task.   

Alternatively, teachers can use the page as part of an assignment that can then be formally graded. 

How To Lock the Collaboration Section in a Class Notebook 

Once you have finished working in the collaboration space, set it back to unlocked to allow students to join the next time you need to use it.   

How To Lock the Collaboration Section in a Class Notebook 

Watch a step-by-step guide on how to lock your collaboration space in Class Teams. 



If you have any questions on how to lock your collaboration space in Class Teams, please contact a member of our team today.

 

How To Deal With Unwanted Guests In Class Teams Meetings

In this guide, we discuss how we can prevent unwelcome guests from joining our online lessons in Microsoft Teams.  

Enable lobby for all Class Teams meetings in your school. 

Making sure the meeting policy for teachers within this school’s tenancy is set so that the lobby is enabled.  

Firstly, make sure your meeting policy for teachers is set within the school’s tenancy to enable the lobby.  

By default, all attendees enter the session through the lobby, which means you’re able to accept or reject members coming into the session, allowing you to avoid any unwelcome guests attending your session at all. 

Enable lobby for a specific Class Teams meeting. 

If the lobby isn’t automatically enabled for teachers in your school, you can choose to enable the lobby manually on your meetings and classes. 

Once you set up and save your meeting, you can then select Edit.  

How To Stop Unwanted Guests In Your Class Teams Meetings

Select Meeting Options and then set the Who can bypass the lobby? option to Only me.  

Enable Lobby for a specific Classt Teams Meeting

How to spot an unwelcome guest in your Class Teams meeting. 

As students enter the meeting lobby, you can see their names and icons appearing in the Participants panel.  

One sign of a user who isn’t supposed to be in the meeting is they will usually have (Guest) after their name.   

How to spot an unwelcome guest in your Class Teams meeting

However, it’s crucial to bear in mind that some legitimate students may appear to be guests for several reasons. 

Students may share devices with family members and could be joining on other accounts with names you do not recognise. To prevent confusion, you should remind students to sign into their own accounts before joining Teams lessons. By establishing this rule, you can prevent students from missing out on crucial lesson time and learning resources, as well as keep the class safe from unwelcome guests.  

How to remove an unwelcome guest from the Teams desktop app. 

Select the red cross beside the user you suspect is an unwelcome guest and that removes them from the lobby and denies them access to the lesson.  

Note: They can attempt to rejoin, but they’re flagged up in the lobby area with no access to your online lesson. 

Select the green tick beside your students’ names to admit them to the lesson.  

How to remove an unwelcome guest from the Class Teams meeting via desktop app

How to remove an unwelcome guest from the browser version of Teams. 

As students enter the lobby, a notification shows on the navigation bar. 

How to remove an unwelcome guest from the browser version of Teams

While you can admit students from this notification by selecting Accept, we strongly recommend selecting View Lobby to bring up a list of users in the lobby.  

Alternatively, you can also select the View Participants icon on the navigation bar.  

Show participants

When you can view a list of users who are waiting in the lobby and follow the same steps as you would in the desktop app:  

Select the red cross beside the user you suspect is an unwelcome guest, and that removes them from the lobby and denies them access to the lesson. 

Note: They can attempt to rejoin, but they’re flagged in the lobby area with no access to your online lesson. 

Select the green tick beside your students’ names to admit them to the lesson.  

How to view participants in browser version of Teams  

What happens if I accidentally admit an unwelcome guest into my Class Teams meeting? 

Select the three dots (…) next to the unwelcome guest’s name to bring up several options. 

Choose Remove from meeting to kick the unwelcome guest out of the lesson. 

Removing unwanted guest from the meeting

Watch our step-by-step video guide on how to deal with unwanted guests in Class Teams meetings:



If you have any questions on how to deal with unwanted guests in Class Teams meetings, please contact a member of our team today.

How to Get Everyone in Your School Confidently Using Microsoft Teams – A Guide to Long-Term User Adoption for Schools

The main challenge schools, academies and multi academy trusts face when rolling out a new technology or platform is user adoption.

Typically, a core group of tech-savvy teachers and staff embrace the new technology, while others are left behind.

This results in various, separate solutions being used within the school, with learning resources scattered across different places and servers and – ultimately – your school not making the most of the technology it has invested in.

But the key reason for this isn’t usually the platform or technology itself. Instead, it’s a lack of a clear, long-term plan and strategy.

Switching to a brand-new technology isn’t easy; it’s a significant change for all involved. But we must make sure that we bring everyone along together on the journey to ensure higher user adoption and avoid leaving anyone behind.

Of course, a further problem has also been born in 2020. Covid-19.



Many schools were forced to adopt tools like Microsoft Teams and SharePoint for short-term gains due to school closures and remote teaching.

While this placed a plaster over the problem and gave students the short-term support they needed to learn from home temporarily, the rushed approach didn’t take into consideration the potential long-term impact of the technology.

We now need to take a step back and think about a long-term strategy so that the technology you’ve invested in serves your staff and students for years to come.

Moving to the cloud isn’t brand new for 2020. Schools have been adopting Teams and SharePoint to reap the benefits of centralised resources, lower server costs and enhanced learning for years.

Whether you already have Teams and SharePoint, or if you’re new to cloud-based learning, now is the time to implement a long-term strategy for your new technology. And here’s how you can do that.

  • Communicate your vision to the school.
  • Give key people ownership over the project.
  • Set a long-term plan.
  • Set milestones and key dates.
  • Deliver hands-on training.
  • Measure your success and resolve issues.
  • Adjust, adapt and adopt.

The User Adoption Journey

Communicate your vision to the school.

Introduce the new technology to your staff to let them know what your vision is and what the new way of working will look like.

It’s crucial to outline your key reasons for switching to the new technology by explaining clearly the benefits to the school, to staff and to students. Weaving it into your school ethos and culture further strengthens your argument and helps to get more people on board with the idea.

Three things to keep in mind when communicating your vision:

  • What does the new reality look like?
  • What are the benefits to the school?
  • How does this fit in with the school ethos and culture?

Here’s an example of how a school has tied in their new technology with their school ethos:

School Vision

Give key people ownership over the project.

Select a group of champions who work with you on the project to help with the planning stage and drive user adoption within their department.

This stage is important because having representatives from each area of the school not only enables them to have a sense of ownership over the product but also encourages other staff members to use the technology as it rolls out.

A typical project team might look like this:

Project Team:

  • Curriculum representatives for Teaching and Learning.
  • MIS Manager.
  • Head of Digital Strategy.
  • IT Support Team.

What do they do:

  • Plan and own product.
  • Showcase benefits to staff.
  • Provide training support.

Department Champions:

  • Curriculum Lead from each department.

What do they do:

  • Drive usage in their departments.
  • Showcase benefits.
  • Provide cascaded training.

Set a long-term plan.

The planning stages are vital to save time, money and ensure the new technology works well for everyone who will be using it.

Use spreadsheets to map out what you need the software to do for your school.

For SharePoint, a central space is essential to avoid unnecessary duplication of work and files, scattered resources and information siloes.

It’s easy to fall into the habit of everyone creating their own sites, with no central governance, and we’ve found this has been a common problem for schools who were compelled to rush adoption as a response to coronavirus.

If this sounds like you, don’t panic. Now is your chance to get everything in order and avoid more work in the future.

The key concept to keep in mind when planning is to think about the long term and how you can scale up your use of this technology year after year.

Here is an example of how a simple plan for SharePoint for schools might look like:

SharePoint home page.

Whether you’re a member of staff or a student, you can access published news and information about the school here.

Communication sites.

Sites for publishing information to large groups of people. Content is there to be consumed, rather than co-authored – for example, staff briefings, library services and policy documents.

Non-curriculum teams.

Secure areas only accessible to small groups of people who need access. For example, finance and administration .

It’s essential to keep this a flat, simple structure that is easy to scale up.

Subject sites.

All of your long-term resources are stored here. It’s a central place that has resources stored so they can be used year after year.

There’s a tendency to use Class Teams for this, which works for one academic year, but as soon as that ends, teachers need to duplicate all the content to another Class Team.

Storing all resources in SharePoint not only reduces the duplication of work, but also unlocks further opportunities. Departments can share resources, co-author documents and Heads of Departments can check the quality of the learning resources.

Teams.

Used for collaborating and communicating with other people. For example, department groups, the finance team and Class Teams.

One crucial thing to remember is you don’t have to get it right first time. It’s a process, and by listening to feedback, you’re able to build a solution that works for everyone in your school.

SharePoint education megamenu

Set milestones and key dates.

User adoption doesn’t happen overnight. There’s no quick fix, and it’s an ongoing process.

Break up your long-term plan into milestones, helping users have something to aim for, as well as to celebrate progress.

For example, it could be that you set your file servers to read-only by a specific date, allowing staff to have a deadline for when they need to move their resources to the cloud.

Three things to remember when setting milestones:

  • Be realistic – it’s not going to happen overnight.
  • Be flexible – milestones can be pushed back or brought forward, depending on your school and staff.
  • Get feedback – listen to your users and adapt your approach.

Deliver hands-on training.

Support staff by delivering quality, hands-on training.

Avoid one huge webinar presentation and get people involved using the software.

Deliver training to small groups, not everyone at once. Think about how you’d teach a lesson to students.

Split up teaching and non-teaching staff to tailor the sessions as much as possible to the audience. Teaching staff need to know about some features that non-teaching staff won’t use – for example, Assignments in Teams.

Grouping by ability helps to make sure no one gets left behind, and you’re not training staff on tools and features they’re already confident using.

Three things to keep in mind when delivering training:

  • Don’t train once and stop there, refreshers might be needed.
  • Be open to feedback and adapt your process.
  • Do your students need training too?

If you’re stuck on where to get started with training, we have some free training videos that are specifically geared towards schools.

Measure your success and resolve issues.

Evaluate your progress and measure user adoption as you move through your plan.

You can do this by getting feedback from staff and regularly talking to your champions to spot any barriers and challenges users are facing.

Microsoft Forms is a great way to do this. You can create a quick survey to see what areas you need to improve on. And, with Microsoft Teams , you can see who is using the software and – more crucially – who isn’t.

Three areas to monitor when you measure user adoption:

  • The key challenges people are facing.
  • The features that aren’t being used by staff.
  • The staff/departments who aren’t using the software.

At Cloud Design Box, we have our own analytic dashboard to help keep track of teacher user adoption with Teams assignments.

Cloud Design Box Teams Insights

Adjust, adapt and adopt.

Once you have collected feedback and data showing your user adoption progress, it’s essential to adjust and adapt your process to suit your school’s needs.

This is different for every school, but for example, it might be that you need to adjust training to suit the ability of your staff, or, alternatively, focus on a specific area where a large percentage of staff are struggling.

Three keys things to keep in mind when adjusting your process:

  • Be realistic.
  • Don’t be afraid to go back.
  • Keep checking user adoption and adapt accordingly.

User Adoption Cycle

By staying realistic, setting clear goals and adjusting your process, you’ll be able to get everyone on board with your new technology.

Do you need help with user adoption or a Teams solution that helps save teacher time? Contact us for a chat:

Email: info@clouddesignbox.co.uk
Website: https://www.clouddesignbox.co.uk/contact
Telephone: 01482 688890

Helping Microsoft Teams and SharePoint Work Better for your Teachers, School and MAT – Free Webinars and Training

Arbor MIS is partnering with Cloud Design Box to host three free training sessions specially designed for schools, academies and multi academy trusts who are using, or planning to use, Microsoft Teams to deliver blended learning for their students.



Click here to register for any of our three sessions

Arbor MIS works with over 1,250 primary, secondary and special schools in the UK, making it one of the fastest-growing MIS communities in the country. Helping staff accomplish more, work collaboratively and stay connected on the cloud, Arbor works closely with the Department of Education and Local Authorities to provide tools that save schools time and money.

We work with Arbor to help our customers enjoy more flexibility to set work, collaborate and share resources for their classes; their technology and data helps us to provide access to Class Teams, Class Notebook and centralised subject Teams through an easy-to-use class dashboard.

We’re thrilled to offer three sessions that will take place on Teams across two days, from Tuesday 24 to Wednesday 25 November.

Planning Long Term User Adoption of Microsoft Teams in Schools and MATs

The first session, taking place at 10am on the Tuesday will centre around helping schools with user adoption and planning for the long-term.


Planning Long Term User Adoption of Microsoft Teams in Schools and MATs

It’s perfect for you if you have already adopted Teams but need a hand getting students and staff on board and using the technology. We’ll discuss ways in which you can get started, as well as how you can develop a long-term plan to make the most out of the suite of tools.

Cloud Design Box hosted this at the Department for Education’s EdTech Festival earlier in 2020 and it went down well with school leaders and MATs who needed a clear plan of action to succeed with the software.

Blended Learning for Primary Schools with Microsoft Teams

Specifically built for Primary Schools, this webinar will provide you with a solid foundation of using Teams to deliver learning in and outside of the classroom, for example, using Class Notebook to host and online lesson and making the most out of the conversation features in Teams. This session will take place at 3pm on Tuesday 24 November.


Blended Learning for Primary Schools with Microsoft Teams

Centralising Resources and Reducing Teacher Workload using Microsoft Teams

We know this year has been tough on teachers, who have had to quickly increase their workload to provide digital and online resources for their classes.


Centralising Resources and Reducing Teacher Workload using Microsoft Teams

Tuesday afternoon’s session has been developed with overworked teachers in mind, who are struggling with Teams. We’ll show you some time-saving ways that you can centralise and improve your resources with Teams. This session will take place at 1pm on Wednesday 25 November.


All our webinars are open to anyone working within a school, academy or multi-academy trust. To sign up for any of the sessions, please fill out this form with your details and you’ll be send an email invite to join us in November.

Creating Assignments using Class Notebook Pages

Class Notebook has a really nice feature which allows teachers to distribute pages to student sections so that they can work on their own copy of the page. Since we originally looked at this in a previous blog post, Microsoft Teams now supports setting assignments using Class Notebook pages too.

Essentially there are two ways to do the same thing, so which should you choose? We would recommend only using Class Notebook to distribute pages if the work is informal (like class work) and we would recommend setting the assignment through Teams if it’s going to be marked (homework, assignments, etc).

The reason for this is you can collect formal marks and comments in the assignment app that you just can’t do through Class Notebook.



To set an assignment using a Class Notebook page:

Create a new assignment and add the Class Notebook page as a resource. Students will be able to have their own copy of the page that you select.

Class Notebook in Teams Assignments

Select a section to push the page into when the student completes it.

Class Notebook Section to distribute

Complete the rest of the assignment form and publish it.

When reviewing student work, you will have the option to annotate the Class Notebook page in addition to adding formal feedback and scores. This gives you the best of both worlds. Simple annotation and feedback on the student work but also a place for formal marks and comments which will become part of an exportable marksheet.

View student work in Class Notebook and teams

Office 365 User Adoption Podcast Episode 3 – Cornerstone Academy Trust

SharePoint, Class Notebook and Teams forms the foundation for curriculum delivery at The Cornerstone Academy Trust.

Hearing stories about how other schools and academies are thriving with Office 365 and SharePoint is a great way to feel inspired.

Our new podcast series focuses on real-life user adoption cases and aims to encourage a community resource for those who are interested in how Microsoft can help you, and your pupils, achieve more.

In our third episode, Tony Phillips, Cloud Design Box Founder and Darren Hemming, our Operations Manager, spoke with Jonathan Bishop, CEO of The Cornerstone Academy Trust.



The headteacher – who has been teaching for the past 25 years – offers some real insight into the way Office 365 and SharePoint can be embraced in and outside of the classroom.

“Office 365, SharePoint and – in particular – Class Notebook, has had a huge impact on our Trust. OneNote totally underpins our lesson planning, teaching and student engagement – before, during and after lessons,” Jonathan enthuses.

“It’s the one fundamental tool in Office 365 that supports our whole curriculum delivery.”

The Cornerstone Academy Trust is a multi-academy trust that currently covers Broadclyst Community Primary School, Westclyst Community Primary School and The Cornerstone Teaching School.

Supporting children from the age of two through to 11, the Trust places technology firmly at the helm of the school ethos.

“We have invested in a number of Surface Pro tablets so that our students can access learning resources from wherever they are in the school or at home,” he tells us.

Jonathan describes one typical use of OneNote in the classroom:

“Teachers write on the whiteboard in digital ink, and this immediately syncs to the pupils’ tablets. This content is then used during smaller, targeted group sessions. And, when they get home, students seamlessly pick up what they were doing during the day, further strengthening their learning.”

All learning resources are available at the child’s fingertips, while teachers can work together and prepare valuable learning materials for students.



“We’ve worked with Cloud Design Box to configure each Class Notebook into different zones: one for teacher content, a collaborative zone for on-going projects and a personal area for each child.”

Permissions and roles can be set with ease for each resource. For example, teacher content is read-only and cannot be edited by pupils, while personal pupil areas can only be accessed by the individual and their teacher.

“Parents can also view the content to see what their children are up to in school, whether this is tracking progress or watching a video of their nursery-aged child learn about butterflies.”

More recently, Cloud Design Box has worked with the Trust to integrate Class Notebook with the communications tool Microsoft Teams.

“Teams has built on the strong system we already had in place. It’s added an extra layer of support to our teaching and learning,” Jonathan reveals.

“The ability to chat about work in targeted groups enhances the learner experience and combines the structure of individual assignments with a collaborative team-driven approach – similar to how adults would in the office.”

In fact, Jonathan is very passionate about how digital tools like SharePoint and Office 365 equip pupils with the skills needed for future employment.

Currently, there is a debate about whether or not we are losing traditional skills, such as handwriting and literacy, but Jonathan argues that tablets and technology are complementing education.

“We don’t think of technology as replacing traditional skills, we think of it as allowing a pupil to gain new, 21st century skills that they’ll use in the workplace.”

Some final takeaways from Jonathan:

  • Digital is enhancing the classroom.
  • SharePoint is a solid foundation for curriculum delivery.
  • Collaboration tools empower students to develop skills for their futures.

Office 365 User Adoption Podcast Episode 2 – Learning From Experience with Gareth Rose.

We understand that seamless user adoption of Office 365 and SharePoint can prove tricky, with many hurdles to jump before your whole organisation is fully on board.

That’s why we’re creating a series of podcasts focusing on real-life user adoption stories, with schools, academies and businesses just like yours.

The second episode features Tony Phillips, Cloud Design Box Founder, and Gareth Rose, Assistant Headteacher at Notley High School & Braintree Sixth Form.

Gareth’s experience with user adoption in schools is unique as he has already been through the process of rolling out Office 365, Teams, SharePoint and Class Notebook at his former workplace, Dagenham Park Church of England School.

We spoke with Gareth to find out what tools and techniques he is going to reuse when introducing the Microsoft suite to the staff and pupils at Notley High School.



Create champions.

“My first piece of advice is to get people to become champions of the product. Get the RE teacher to understand the value in putting all their class resources online and show the Music teacher how pupils can annotate in OneNote,” Gareth enthuses.

Starting out with small, basic tasks, Gareth got to know the main pain points of departments and the word spread from there.

“You can see the spark in their eyes when you’ve saved them 20 minutes of time using a basic feature of Office 365.”

Give them no choice.

“A very quick win is changing everyone’s home page to the staff or pupil SharePoint. This gets people familiar with the technology and helps them to become comfortable with using it in the future,” Gareth continues.

“Make it so it’s the only way to access some resources, such as the lunchtime duty rota. When people start to see how beneficial it is to have one calendar that is regularly updated, rather than multiple emails with multiple versions, they begin to gain confidence in the system.”

From here, Gareth explains, the word ‘SharePoint’ was being banded around the staffroom and uttered in staff meetings. By getting people to engage with the platform, you can raise their confidence when it comes to moving more activities across to Office 365.

Have an open-door policy.

“Of course, giving people only one choice when accessing certain documents is risky. But, explain to people, if they have any issues, they can come and see you,” he points out.

“At Dagenham Park, I would sit in with teachers on the first few lessons to get them and their pupils properly set up. In a couple of sessions, teachers and students were writing digital notes and recording their voices in French – incredible to see.”

Working with members of staff and pupils in this way also allows you to understand the many ways in which Office 365 and SharePoint can help enhance the teaching and learning experience.

“After this, it’s kind of like a rolling stone,” Gareth highlights.

“I can see a time in the future where all pupils have iPads. We’ve seen schools hand out devices to their students, but without an ecosystem in which they can actually use them in. What we’re building here is an environment where everyone is on board and using the features of Office 365 to their full potential.”

Final, takeaway points from Gareth:

  • Create and identify champions of Office 365 and SharePoint.
  • Get to know ways in which individuals and departments could benefit from using the suite.
  • Change the homepage and make some resources available only on SharePoint.
  • Be prepared to offer support and answer any questions people have.
  • Design an ecosystem in which people can use Office 365.

If you have any questions about user adoption, or how Office 365 and SharePoint could transform your workspace, school or academy, please get in touch with Cloud Design Box today.