Tag Archives: Derby

Troubleshooting “this site has not been shared with you”

I’m often asked to solve permission errors in SharePoint. It’s not hard to do with the tools available in SharePoint, you don’t even have to know much about AD especially if you use SharePoint groups.

Ways to permission a SharePoint site:

  • Permission directly against the user – not recommended as a lot of maintenance required when someone joins or leaves the organisation.
  • Use SharePoint Groups – SharePoint groups allow you to manage users within the SharePoint interface, they can be reused all over the site collection
  • Active Directory Security Groups – AD groups might already exist on your domain, these can be used but be aware that SharePoint 2013 caches the membership of these groups for around 2 hours and when using Office 365, DirSync will need to run to replicate these groups in the cloud.

What can be permissioned in SharePoint?

  • Sites – entire subsites
  • Lists – individual lists and libraries such as a document library
  • Folders – folders within a library
  • Items – items within a list or library

SharePoint permissions flow down the site from the root of the site collection unless otherwise changed. If permissions are changed at any level, any items below it will inherit the changed permissions.

SharePoint has a very easy way to check permissions of an individual user, check out my video below on how to use it.



How to create a basic content type

I’ve just created a video guide on creating a simple content type and attaching it to a document library.

You can add custom metadata to a SharePoint list by:

  • Adding columns directly onto the list
  • Using Site Columns (can be reused with other lists)
  • Content Types (can be reused and keeps a set of custom columns together in a content type)

If you decide to use a content type, you will also get the benefits of being able to apply a workflow to the content type (rather than to each list individually). If you are thinking of developing search, content types can be a great way to filter and search for specific types of data in a list. You can also use multiple content types in a list (each with different columns), for example an invoice and a receipt.



Selecting an Office 365 Business plan for the first time

Microsoft provide a nice comparison list of all the available 365 plans for business.

Click here to view the comparison table

However when planning to move to Office 365, you may not have considered the implications of initially choosing a particular plan. You may also have a number of different licences for different users in the organisation (you don’t have to stick to one plan). For example some users may need to download office on their machine (accountants using the full desktop version of Excel) and some may just need a mailbox. I briefly go over the different plans in the video below.



Remember that business licences are for users who don’t need centralised deployment and control. Small businesses may opt for the business licences while larger ones may need some compliance and centralised administration.

Just a quick note on upgrading licences for older tenancies using the Office 365 small business plan. I recently worked with a client using the old Small Business licences, they wanted to upgrade to enterprise but due to it being on the old 365 platform, it wasn’t possible to upgrade from within the admin centre. The only option to upgrade was to create a new tenancy, manually migrate PST files (exchange) and re-sync document libraries (SharePoint) up to the new tenancy using OneDrive for business sync tool. Very annoying and a lot of work! However all users on the new platform with Business licences can upgrade their licences in-place by going to the subscriptions page. I have also been informed by Microsoft that these older plans cannot be renewed after October 2015 and Microsoft will offer some migration options before the licences run out.

SharePoint Consultancy and Services

Cloud Design Box

A few months ago, I started a new SharePoint consultancy business. I will continue to add blog posts here but you can contact me directly for any of the following Microsoft SharePoint and Office 365 services by clicking here:

  • Responsive design and branding
  • Site architecture planning and implementation
  • Workflow and consultancy services
  • SharePoint upgrades
  • Office 365 configuration
  • SharePoint Support
  • Scripting and client object model solutions

We provide these services for education and for business. Please visit the website for more information www.clouddesignbox.co.uk

List subsites using the JavaScript client object model in SharePoint 2013

SharePoint Office 365 Site Creation JavaScript

To do this, use the script editor web part or the page viewer web part (and put the HTML file in a document library).

To start off, setup the HTML to include jQuery and sp.js (see below).

SP.SOD.executeFunc('sp.js', 'SP.ClientContext', function () {
 //alert('loaded');
});

JQuery functions are used to populate HTML containers on the page.

<div id="tonycontent">
	<!-- Dashboard -->
	<div id="tonydashboard" class="tonycontenttable">
	</div>
</div>

The first function loads the current site. The get_current function returns the current context of the user from which the subsites can be retrieved (see below).

function getSubWebs(){
	clientContext = new SP.ClientContext.get_current();
	web = clientContext.get_web();
    	webCollection = web.getSubwebsForCurrentUser(null);
    	clientContext.load(webCollection);
    	clientContext.executeQueryAsync(onGetSubwebsSuccess, onGetSubwebsFail);
}

If the query is successful it will load the onGetSubwebsSuccess function, otherwise it will run onGetSubwebsFail function.

In the success function, the webCollection variable is looped through to retrieve the URL and the title of each subsite. JQuery functions are then used to append the HTML containers.

function onGetSubwebsSuccess(sender, args){
	jQuery("#tonydashboard").empty();
	var html4 ="<div class='tonycontenttablerow'><div class='tonycontenttabletitle'>Site Name</div><div class='tonycontenttabletitle'>Site URL</div></div>";
	jQuery("#tonydashboard").append(html4);
    var webEnumerator = webCollection.getEnumerator();	
    while (webEnumerator.moveNext()){
        var web = webEnumerator.get_current();
		var webtitle = web.get_title();
		var weburl = web.get_serverRelativeUrl();
        var html3="<div class='tonycontenttablerow'><div class='tonycontenttablecolumn'>" + webtitle + "</div><div class='tonycontenttablecolumn'>" + weburl + "</div></div>";
		jQuery("#tonydashboard").append(html3);
    }
}

Download the full code here

The client object model can also be used to create subsites from templates, permission sites, create lists and much more! This method works on both 365 SharePoint Online and SharePoint 2010 and SharePoint 2013 on-premises.

SharePoint 2013 JavaScript Client Object Model

Using document templates in SharePoint (365 and on premise)

Document Library Templates

Each content type in a document library can be assigned an individual document templates. In the document library below, two different content types have been added, each with a different template.

Tony is here

To edit the word templates, open the site in SharePoint designer 2013.

SharePoint Designer

Open the document library.

SharePoint Designer

In the content types section, open the content type (in this case it is called Policy).

Content Types

In the ribbon select “Edit Document Template”.

Edit Template

This will allow you to create a dotx document which will be the template for this particular content type in this library. Once the template has been saved, it will be available as the main template for the content type.

Select Document

When users create a document using the Policy content type from the new menu, it will prompt them to enter a name for the new document.

Name Document

Please note that currently, the new templates will only open in Office Web Apps (online) if using Internet Explorer. Other browsers will prompt to open in the client application.

Office web Apps online

JavaScript Client Object Model in SharePoint 2013

SharePoint 2013 has a new and more complete JavaScript Client Object Model API. Some of the additional functionality is using social networking.

Using the JS COM, followers can be pulled from SharePoint for the current user or a specific user. This might be used for creating a new social networking interface

My Followers

First load JQuery and the SharePoint 2013 JavaScript functions. The JavaScript functions are loaded on the page so it is just a case of waiting for specific functions to be loaded before the script will work correctly (see below):

SP.SOD.executeFunc('sp.js', 'SP.ClientContext', function () {
	SP.SOD.executeFunc('userprofile', 'SP.UserProfiles', function () {
		tonyishereGetUserProfileProperties();
	});
});

Once the functions are loaded, the People manager object can be created. The example below was taken from the Micrsoft site and modified, this is a great resource if you are starting out with the client object model.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/office/jj679673.aspx

function tonyishereGetUserProfileProperties() {
    // Get the current client context.
    var clientContext = SP.ClientContext.get_current();
    // Get the PeopleManager instance.
    var peopleManager = new SP.UserProfiles.PeopleManager(clientContext);
    // Get the people who are following the current user.
    Followers = peopleManager.getMyFollowers();
    clientContext.load(Followers);
    // Send the request to the server.
    clientContext.executeQueryAsync(displayFollowers, requestFailed)
}

Once the object has been loaded successfully, functions can be run to pull out the required data. In the example below, the data is stored in a string which is then displayed as HTML in a div using JQuery.

function displayFollowers() {
    var results = Followers.getEnumerator();
	var myFollowers = "Followers<br />";
    while (results.moveNext()) {
    var person = results.get_current();
		myFollowers = myFollowers + "<br />" + person.get_displayName();
    }
	jQuery("#MyFollowers").html(myFollowers);
}

The script was added to the page without the use of Visual Studio or SharePoint Designer 2013. The script was inserted using the Script Editor web part. This web part runs client side code such as HTML and JavaScript.

Script Editor

The same methods can be used to pull out a whole host of data from the social aspects of SharePoint 2013 including the profile picture, display name, hash tags and trending topics.

Profile web part

Troubleshooting Office Web App Farm Installations

New functionality in Microsoft Office Web Apps is the preview feature in search (see below). Setting up a separate farm for Office Web Apps is a great way to improve performance and make a scalable solution but it can bring up some new technical challenges. A couple of the most common issues are listed below.

Web Apps Search Preview

Do the internal and external URLs of the Web Apps Server resolve from the SharePoint server?

Test: https://webapps.contoso.com/hosting/discovery
Should return XML without certificate error

Test: https://WebAppServer01.contoso.com/hosting/discovery
Should return XML without certificate error

Certificate Error?

When setting up the web apps farm, a SAN certificate needs to be specified with both the internal URL and the external URL (see below). Wildcard or single host certificates will not work.

SAN Certificate
404 not found?

Both the SharePoint and Web App server need to see each other. Make sure that internal DNS is setup for the external web app address. Run ipconfig /flushdns on the SharePoint server. The SharePoint server needs to resolve both addresses internally.

The Web Apps server also needs to have an entry for the SharePoint site URL. Ensure that the SharePoint site has an internal DNS entry and flush the DNS on the web apps server. Browse to the SharePoint site on the web apps server to ensure that it can see the site without any certificate errors.

Client-side RSS feed viewer using JavaScript

There are plenty of server-side RSS feed viewers out there but very little in the case of client-side JavaScript based viewers. Below I will go through the steps of creating a simple JavaScript based RSS feed viewer. Please note that this will only work with RSS feeds on the same domain. JavaScript does not allow cross domain scripting. You may find ways round this by using some of the Google API.

RSS Viewer
Create HTML Container

First begin by creating a HTML div container with a unique ID.

<div id="myDiv"></div>

Make a XML HTTP Request

The following function returns the data from an RSS (XML) page. As far as I am aware there is no way to use this cross domain, so you will have to look for a server-side script to work cross domains.

function httpGet(theUrl) {
			var xmlHttp = null;
			xmlHttp = new XMLHttpRequest();
			xmlHttp.open("GET", theUrl, false);
			xmlHttp.send();
			return xmlHttp.responseXML;
		}
var rssFeedData = httpGet('http://www.tonyishere.co.uk/RSSExample/rss.xml');

Loop through the data and retrieve tags by name

Once this data has been stored in the variable as an object, we can use the “getElementsByTagName” function to pull out a particular tag (title in this case). Looping through all the tags called “title” will go through all of the XML from top to bottom. While looping through the tags, we can store the title and description in arrays to use later.

			var i=0;
			var allTitles = [];
		var allDescriptions = [];
			// loop through all of the items and put them in arrays
			while (rssFeedData.getElementsByTagName("title")[i])
			{
					allTitles[i] = rssFeedData.getElementsByTagName("title")[i];
					allDescriptions[i] = rssFeedData.getElementsByTagName("description")[i];
					flag=i;
					i=i+1;
			}

Loop through the arrays and render the data

Looking at the structure of the XML, you should be able to pick out the child nodes. In this case, each item is the first node (numbering starts from 0).

This can then be rendered as HTML and inserted into the div created earlier. In the example below I have decided to store the description and call an onclick function to show the description.

for (i=0;i<flag;i++){
				titles[i]=allTitles[i].childNodes[0].nodeValue;
				descriptions[i]=allDescriptions[i].childNodes[0].nodeValue;
				document.getElementById('myDiv').innerHTML = newHTML;
				newHTML = document.getElementById('myDiv').innerHTML;
				newHTML = newHTML + "<div class=\"titlearea\" id=\"title" + i + "\" onclick=\"showdesc('" + i + "');\">" + titles[i] +"</div><div id=\"desc" + i + "\"></div>";
				document.getElementById('myDiv').innerHTML = newHTML;
			}

Show the description

When the onclick function to display the description is run, the function below inserts the description stored in the array into the desc div. The array position was called as an argument to the function. This enables us to display the correct description in the div.

function showdesc(idc){
			var idcdesc = "desc" + idc;
			document.getElementById(idcdesc).innerHTML = descriptions[(idc-1)];
		}

Starting point for RSS feed viewer

Click on the link below to see the full code working. This is a very simple example of what can be done with RSS feeds using client-side scripting only. Hope this is of interest, please contact me on twitter for feedback and questions.

RSS Viewer Example