Tag Archives: Behaviour

How To Deal With Unwanted Guests In Class Teams Meetings

In this guide, we discuss how we can prevent unwelcome guests from joining our online lessons in Microsoft Teams.  

Enable lobby for all Class Teams meetings in your school. 

Making sure the meeting policy for teachers within this school’s tenancy is set so that the lobby is enabled.  

Firstly, make sure your meeting policy for teachers is set within the school’s tenancy to enable the lobby.  

By default, all attendees enter the session through the lobby, which means you’re able to accept or reject members coming into the session, allowing you to avoid any unwelcome guests attending your session at all. 

Enable lobby for a specific Class Teams meeting. 

If the lobby isn’t automatically enabled for teachers in your school, you can choose to enable the lobby manually on your meetings and classes. 

Once you set up and save your meeting, you can then select Edit.  

How To Stop Unwanted Guests In Your Class Teams Meetings

Select Meeting Options and then set the Who can bypass the lobby? option to Only me.  

Enable Lobby for a specific Classt Teams Meeting

How to spot an unwelcome guest in your Class Teams meeting. 

As students enter the meeting lobby, you can see their names and icons appearing in the Participants panel.  

One sign of a user who isn’t supposed to be in the meeting is they will usually have (Guest) after their name.   

How to spot an unwelcome guest in your Class Teams meeting

However, it’s crucial to bear in mind that some legitimate students may appear to be guests for several reasons. 

Students may share devices with family members and could be joining on other accounts with names you do not recognise. To prevent confusion, you should remind students to sign into their own accounts before joining Teams lessons. By establishing this rule, you can prevent students from missing out on crucial lesson time and learning resources, as well as keep the class safe from unwelcome guests.  

How to remove an unwelcome guest from the Teams desktop app. 

Select the red cross beside the user you suspect is an unwelcome guest and that removes them from the lobby and denies them access to the lesson.  

Note: They can attempt to rejoin, but they’re flagged up in the lobby area with no access to your online lesson. 

Select the green tick beside your students’ names to admit them to the lesson.  

How to remove an unwelcome guest from the Class Teams meeting via desktop app

How to remove an unwelcome guest from the browser version of Teams. 

As students enter the lobby, a notification shows on the navigation bar. 

How to remove an unwelcome guest from the browser version of Teams

While you can admit students from this notification by selecting Accept, we strongly recommend selecting View Lobby to bring up a list of users in the lobby.  

Alternatively, you can also select the View Participants icon on the navigation bar.  

Show participants

When you can view a list of users who are waiting in the lobby and follow the same steps as you would in the desktop app:  

Select the red cross beside the user you suspect is an unwelcome guest, and that removes them from the lobby and denies them access to the lesson. 

Note: They can attempt to rejoin, but they’re flagged in the lobby area with no access to your online lesson. 

Select the green tick beside your students’ names to admit them to the lesson.  

How to view participants in browser version of Teams  

What happens if I accidentally admit an unwelcome guest into my Class Teams meeting? 

Select the three dots (…) next to the unwelcome guest’s name to bring up several options. 

Choose Remove from meeting to kick the unwelcome guest out of the lesson. 

Removing unwanted guest from the meeting

Watch our step-by-step video guide on how to deal with unwanted guests in Class Teams meetings:



If you have any questions on how to deal with unwanted guests in Class Teams meetings, please contact a member of our team today.

How To Achieve More With Breakout Rooms In Microsoft Teams (Microsoft 365 User Adoption Podcast Episode 13)

Breakout rooms in Microsoft Class Teams launched in January 2021, allowing teachers to create sub-meetings within the main class meeting for students to work together in small groups and discuss their learning.

In this discussion, we’ve included everything you need to know about breakout rooms in Teams, from how to set them up to safeguarding and saving time.




Listen on Spotify

How To Set Up Breakout Rooms In Class Teams

It’s straightforward to set up breakout rooms in Class Teams.

You can set up a breakout room once the meeting is open in the desktop app by selecting the breakout room button.

start teams breakout room

We have a step-by-step guide on setting up breakout rooms in Class Teams here.

The teacher can manually allocate each student to a specific breakout room or allow Teams to decide automatically. It’s entirely your choice – many teachers prefer to manually assign students, but it might be quicker to randomly assign everyone.

Once a breakout room is open, the students are placed into the room after 10 seconds. Breakout rooms can also be renamed.

How To Save Time Setting up Breakout Rooms in Class Teams

Currently, breakout rooms cannot be pre-planned and must be created while you’re in a Class Teams meeting. However, there are several ways to get around this.

The first is to open the meeting early and set out the rooms, then exit the meeting until you need to return, i.e. at the time of the class.

The second is to create recurring meetings for your lessons. Once you set up your breakout rooms in your first recurring meeting, it’ll save those rooms and reallocate the same students to the rooms for the next lesson.

reoccurring mreeting

How To Structure Breakout Rooms in Class Teams

The structure of your breakout rooms depends largely on how you teach your class. Here are some common examples:

  • Pairs or small groups.
  • Mixed ability groups.
  • Small groups with a teaching assistant.
  • Similar ability groups – i.e. red table, yellow table.

Think about how you structure your physical classroom and how you would group together students and apply this to the online classroom.

Ideas for Breakout Rooms in Class Teams.

Like with real-life group work in schools, breakout rooms are a great way to engage students in a different way that simply listening to the lesson and completing individual tasks.

Our Teaching and Learning consultant Darren Hemming was formerly a Modern Foreign Languages Teacher and has some ideas on how he’d use breakout rooms to enhance learning:

“One way is to set up a jigsaw activity, where each group takes a specific area or topic and completes questions or a task around that topic. Each group can then be brought back into the main Class Teams lesson to present to the rest of the class,” says Darren.

“There’s also the possibility of putting students into groups to complete individual work, but the breakout room is there as a co-working space. So the students can be working on their tasks, whether that’s completing a set of questions or doing some artwork, and if they get stuck, they can ask for peer support.”

Darren also points out that breakout rooms are a great way to reduce distractions on a students’ screen. If their screen is filled with 30 people, they may be less likely to contribute and also get distracted by their whole class staring virtually back at them.

Smaller groups mean fewer distractions and a less daunting environment to ask questions and contribute.

Safeguarding Students in Class Teams Breakout Rooms.

Safeguarding issues, inappropriate behaviour and cyberbullying are common concerns among teachers and staff who are dipping their toes into the world of breakout rooms.

“Firstly, you need to set expectations and communicate with both students and parents about what type of behaviour is acceptable during online learning,” Darren adds.

“Whether students are being taught online or in the classroom, safeguarding issues crop up. But there are some ways teachers can use the technology to closely monitor what’s happening within each room, as well as encourage them to stay on task.”

Teachers can hop in and out of the breakout rooms unannounced, and by doing this regularly, you can make sure students are staying on track.

Breakout rooms can also be recorded, which may help deter students from getting distracted or behaving inappropriately. To do this, teachers need to join the breakout room and hit record, but when they leave the breakout room, Teams will continue recording.

Another step to take in terms of safeguarding is updating your online learning policy to include Class Teams and breakout rooms.

“It’s all about being clear with your students that the expectations online are exactly the same as they would be on school premises,” says Darren.

Keeping Students On Task in Class Teams Breakout Rooms.

The methods mentioned above on safeguarding in breakout rooms can also be applied to keep students on task and steer them away from distractions and off-topic conversations.

A key way to keep students on task in breakout rooms is to keep the sessions short. By injecting a bit of urgency into the breakout rooms – i.e. only opening them for a few minutes at a time, you can make sure students are focusing on the task and not getting bored, going off-topic.

“It’s difficult to discipline students if they’re behaviour isn’t appropriate when teaching an online class. But you can always take them out of a breakout room (or the main Class Teams area) and into a breakout room with only you and talk to them about their behaviour,” Darren suggests.

“Of course, if the behaviour becomes an ongoing issue, you can then decide to take it further through the usual processes of your school, whether that would be to talk to their form tutor, head of house and eventually parents/guardians.”

Other Things To Remember About Class Teams Breakout Rooms.

Here are some additional tips you need to know about breakout rooms in Class Teams:

  • When a student enters a breakout room, their mic is unmuted and they have the ability to share their screen and present. But when they re-enter the main lesson, they are muted and can no longer present.
  • Recordings of individual breakout rooms are only shared with the specific participants, not everyone in the class. The teacher can access them, if needed, via OneDrive.
  • Reminders and time warning messages can be sent by the teacher to all breakout rooms to communicate with the class.

Setting Team Policies for Safeguarding in Education

Before you start to use Teams in school, it is important to consider setting policies for safeguarding to promote the welfare of children and protect them from harm.

Each school must consider their own policies because one size does not fit all. For example, some schools might be comfortable with students direct messaging teachers for help while others will want this communication in a more open space. The school’s behaviour policy should also be taken into consideration. It is therefore important for IT to involve the safeguarding officer when planning out which policies to apply to users.

Microsoft have made it easier to assign policies to users (this was previously done through PowerShell and still is for some policies – see our previous PowerShell post).

Teams Admin Center

We recommend you create a custom policy for both staff and students. Staff will need changes to the policies too otherwise they won’t be able to do things like delete student messages in Teams (see our previous PowerShell post).



It is also important to remember that there isn’t a single policy to manage teams, it is broken up into:

  • Meeting Policies
  • Live Event Policies
  • Messaging Policies
  • Permission Policies (PowerShell applied only)
  • Emergency Policies (PowerShell applied only)
  • Voice Routing Policies
  • Call Park Policies
  • Calling Policies
  • Caller ID Policies (PowerShell applied only)

For each of these policy types, you will find a Global (Org-wide default) policy which will apply to everyone. Any changes to that policy will apply to everyone automatically.

Create a new policy

Create a new policy and give it a name using the “Add” button.

Create Policy

New messaging policy

Apply the policy to a group

Click on the “Group policy assignment” tab (if it’s not visible refer to our PowerShell post).

Group policy assignment tab

Click “Add group”.

Add Group Button

Search for a group and then select a policy before clicking “Apply”.

Apply Teams Policy to Group

This is much easier and quicker than running PowerShell scripts, we hope you find that useful!

Update 11/11/2020: We have been informed that if you set a user’s policy through PowerShell, this group method above may not work for you and you may need to use PowerShell to apply the policy.