Category Archives: HTML and JavaScript

SharePoint Master Page for iPhone HTML 5 Web App

iPhone Web AppIn my last post, I showed how to create an iPhone web app using HTML5. Recently I have been working on constructing a HTML5 SharePoint Master Page that also works as an iPhone web app.
I managed to do this by downloading Randy Drisgill’s Starter Master Pages Download Here
I then removed as many tags as possible without breaking the publishing Master Page. Changed the doc type, added the meta and link tags (see previous post). This allowed me to create a HTML5 compliant SharePoint Master page which also worked as an iPhone web app. Further customisation is needed to convert the TMG/ISA login form to a mobile friendly smart phone page if you are using an authenticated SharePoint 2010 site.

Creating a HTML5 iPhone Web App!

iPhone App Icon

First create two images which will be vital in creating the iPhone web application. The first image is for the app’s icon. This is the icon you will see when you add it to your home screen. Make sure your image is 57px by 57px and save it as a JPEG or PNG file.

iPhone icon

Startup Screen

The second image is for the app’s loading screen. When the icon is selected, the app will start in full screen mode and display a loading screen while it loads the HTML page in the background. This image should be 320px wide and 460px high.
Startup Screen

HTML 5 page

HTML5 does not yet work in any desktop browser fully yet but more mobile web broswers are supporting it.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
	<head>
		<meta charset=utf-8>
		<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0, maximum-scale=1.0, user-scalable=0"/>
		<meta name="apple-mobile-web-app-capable" content="yes">
		<title>tony is here iPhone web app</title>
		<link rel="stylesheet" href="html5css.css">
		<link rel="apple-touch-icon" href="images/tony-icon.jpg" />
		<link rel="apple-touch-startup-image" href="images/tonystartup.png" />
		<!-- Prompt user to install on iphone if accessed through mobile safari -->
		<script type="text/javascript">
			if (window.navigator.standalone) {
				// fullscreen mode
			} else{
				alert('Install on iPhone by pressing Add to Home Screen')
			}
	</script>
	</head>
	<body>
		<section id="wrapper">
			<header>
				<h1>Tony Phillips SharePoint and Web Design Blog</h1>
			</header>

			<article>
				<section>
					<button type="button" name="Blog" class="css3button" onclick="parent.location='blog.html'">Blog</button>
					<button type="button" name="Linked In" class="css3button" onclick="parent.location='linkedin.html'">Linked In</button>
					<button type="button" name="Facebook" class="css3button" onclick="parent.location='facebook.html'">Facebook</button>
					<button type="button" name="Twitter" class="css3button" onclick="parent.location='twitter.html'">Twitter</button>
					<button type="button" name="Email" class="css3button" onclick="parent.location='email.html'">Email</button>
				</section>
			</article>
		</section>
	</body>
</html>

You may notice a few differences in the example above from a standard HTML page. There are two link tags to provide the iPhone with the icon and loading screen location. These are the two graphics created in the first section of this post.

<link rel="apple-touch-icon" href="images/tony-icon.jpg" />
<link rel="apple-touch-startup-image" href="images/tonystartup.png" />

The two meta tags below scale the site to the mobile device’s screen and enable adding as a web app on the iPhone.

<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0, maximum-scale=1.0, user-scalable=0"/>
<meta name="apple-mobile-web-app-capable" content="yes">

The only new tags in this example are the section, header, article and button tags which all make it much easier to create websites in HTML5. HTML5 is worth a google!

JavaScript

You can also detect if the site is being accessed through the web browser or if it has been loaded from the home screen. If it has been opened in the browser, we can notify the user that they can add this site as a web app. All you need to do is add the following JavaScript in the HEAD section of the HTML.

// Prompt user to install on iphone if accessed through mobile safari
if (window.navigator.standalone) {
// fullscreen mode
} else{
alert('Install on iPhone by pressing Add to Home Screen')
}

Make sure you take full advantage of CSS3 when styling your site. Rounded corners and shadows look great on buttons without the need for background images or jQuery!

To see this example working go to the following URL on your iPhone and add it to your home screen. In my next post I will explain how this could also be a SharePoint MasterPage!

http://www.tonyishere.co.uk/mobile

Corners in IE and Firefox for SharePoint MasterPages

You may find that the OOTB V4 master page has the Meta tag: <meta http-equiv=”X-UA-Compatible” content=”IE=8″/>. This renders the page in IE8 mode even when using IE9.

Web Designers may realise that this means CSS3 rounded corners are not available (http://www.css3.info/preview/rounded-border/). Unfortunately removing this tag breaks SharePoint’s ability to drag and drop web parts between web part zones and a few other quirky things.

Rounded corners in CSS3 use anti-aliasing to give a clean smooth effect. It also renders very fast. Using jQuery.corner.js sometimes slows the page down and causes a slight flicker, the rendering is not as sharp as the CSS3.

Rounded web part zone

To optimise the loading so that IE uses jQuery rounded corners and all other modern browsers use CSS3, I used the following code:

<!–[if IE]>

<script type=”text/javascript”>

jQuery(document).ready(function() {

jQuery(‘.right-wp-zone-core-1’).corner(“12px”);

});

</script>

<![endif]–>

<style type=”text/css”>

.right-wp-zone-core-1{

-moz-border-radius: 12px;

border-radius: 12px;

}

</style>

A bit disappointed with the rendering in IE9 but ensures that all browsers get the best experience possible.

The problem is not that CSS3 doesn’t work with IE 9 (it does very well!) but SharePoint 2010 does not work with IE9 (e.g. dragging web parts, people picker, etc…) so Microsoft force with default Master Page into IE8 mode using the meta tag.

Hopefully there is an update to IE9 soon (maybe automatic??) to fix SharePoint compatibility and then we can all happily use CSS rounded corners!!

Using XSLT, AJAX and jQuery to improve OOTB SharePoint Lists

Using XSL can completely change the way that any standard list view is displayed. There is a great video from Laura Rogers demonstrating what can be done with the XSLT List View in SharePoint Designer here.

XSLT
You can also build your own XSL sheets and use them in the style library by linking them in the web part properties.

Here is a standard web part view of a custom list:

Here is a standard web part view with custom XSL applied:

COM, jQuery and AJAX
Calling the SharePoint Client Object model with JavaScript, we can add items to the list without refreshing the page.
Inside the web part’s AJAX settings we can set the auto refresh so the list displays the new item (again without refreshing the page).
In this example, jQuery sets a fade-in animated gif to show the item being added to the list once send has been pressed. The fade-out effect is applied to the gif once success has been returned to the JavaScript function.
Building solutions like this can create complete customisable solutions using only custom lists in a modern integrated (no refresh) style.

Using Javascript to replace rendered HTML

If you want to replace HTML in a rendered page client side, you may wish to use something like the code below. It is particularly useful in a management system where it is difficult to edit the source code. Replacing the html client side can be a good work around.

Put this function in your header:

<script type=”text/javascript”>
function findAndReplace(searchText, replacement, searchNode) {
if (!searchText || typeof replacement === ‘undefined’) {
// Throw error here if you want…
return;
}
var regex = typeof searchText === ‘string’ ?
new RegExp(searchText, ‘g’) : searchText,
childNodes = (searchNode || document.body).childNodes,
cnLength = childNodes.length,
excludes = ‘html,head,style,title,link,meta,script,object,iframe’;
while (cnLength–) {
var currentNode = childNodes[cnLength];
if (currentNode.nodeType === 1 &&
(excludes + ‘,’).indexOf(currentNode.nodeName.toLowerCase() + ‘,’) === -1) {
arguments.callee(searchText, replacement, currentNode);
}
if (currentNode.nodeType !== 3 || !regex.test(currentNode.data) ) {
continue;
}
var parent = currentNode.parentNode,
frag = (function(){
var html = currentNode.data.replace(regex, replacement),
wrap = document.createElement(‘div’),
frag = document.createDocumentFragment();
wrap.innerHTML = html;
while (wrap.firstChild) {
frag.appendChild(wrap.firstChild);
}
return frag;
})();
parent.insertBefore(frag, currentNode);
parent.removeChild(currentNode);
}
}
</script>

Run the function after the page has loaded, include the text to replace as a variable (Current Text, New Text):

findAndReplace(‘Current Text’, ‘New Text’);