Tag Archives: Microsoft

Microsoft Teams for education replacing Microsoft Classroom Preview

Over the last few months, we have received lots of positive feedback about the new Microsoft Classroom Preview product. Today Microsoft announced in the Office 365 message centre that this would be replaced at the end of July 2017 with Microsoft Teams for Education.

Microsoft Teams for Education

No need to panic, MS Classroom functionality will still exist but in the Microsoft Teams app (from what we can see from the screenshots). You can still set assignments, create class notebooks, discuss, share files and quizzes but it will all be accessed through the Microsoft Teams interface rather than through the MS Classroom App. There is no news on the Microsoft Classroom mobile app for iOS and Android but hopefully this will be replaced so that students can still get notifications for new assignments and grades.

More details can be found on Microsoft’s site here.



You may have seen the following message in the Office 365 message centre, notifying you of the change.

On July 31, 2017, we’ll discontinue support for the Microsoft Classroom Preview, as we work to unify our classroom experiences in Microsoft Teams in Office 365 for Education. Since the Microsoft Classroom Preview released, we’ve been very thankful for schools’ feedback from around the world; which has helped us improve benefits and features of the service. Ultimately, we learned to keep it simple and put classroom resources all in one place. We listened and we’re bringing the best of the classroom features (e.g., Assignments and OneNote Class Notebook) to Microsoft Teams in Office 365 for Education.

How does this affect me?

– Microsoft Classroom Preview will continue with current functionality until July 31, 2017. – Teachers will not be able to create new notebooks or assignments after the July 31, 2017. – Current classes and associated content will continue to be available as Office 365 Groups. Teachers can access assignment resources, files, calendars, and conversations, through tools such as Microsoft Outlook and SharePoint Online. If necessary, they can copy Class Notebook content to their personal workspace (e.g. OneDrive for Business). – When the new class experiences become available in Teams, School Data Sync will start creating the new classes for Microsoft Teams. SDS will continue to sync existing Microsoft Classroom Preview classes through July 31, 2017.

What do I need to do to prepare for this change?

We apologise for any inconvenience resulting from this transition. We encourage you to try out Microsoft Teams, and get yourself familiar with the Teams experience. Please click Additional Information to learn more.

Microsoft Classroom Webinar

I would like to thank everyone who took part in today’s webinar on Microsoft Classroom by Cloud Design Box.

In the session, we covered:

  • How to get Microsoft Classroom
  • How to create a new class
  • Using OneNote Class Notebook to enhance teaching and learning
  • Setting assignments
  • Marking and returning student work
  • Using the mobile apps
  • How to access School Data Sync (SDS)

The session was recorded for all those who missed the session.



I hope everyone found the session useful. We will be putting on additional webinars and live events later this year. Please follow us on Twitter for the latest updates.

Saving Tweets to Excel using Microsoft Flow

Microsoft Flow is the new tool integrated with Office 365 which allows different services to interact. Such as social media providers like Twitter and Facebook or file sharing platforms like Dropbox, OneDrive and Google Drive, and many more services.

I wrote a blog post earlier this year about integrating machine learning tools and another post about syncing Google calendar data into SharePoint using Flow processes, but I thought I would get back to basics and provide a clear easy tutorial for Microsoft Flow newcomers.

In this example, I’m going to setup a Flow to put all the tweets made from the company (my) twitter account into an excel spreadsheet. This is a simple process but might be useful for keeping track of marketing or even leaving an audit trail of marketing activity by the social media owners within an organisation. The excel spreadsheet will sit in OneDrive for business but you can determine where you would like it stored.

To start, we are going to create a new excel spreadsheet with a table. In OneDrive for business, create a new excel spreadsheet called “tweets”.

Microsoft Excel Online

Add the following column headers:

  • Tweet Text
  • Location
  • Time

Select the column headers and in the insert menu, select “table”. This will make a new table in Excel which Flow can access to add rows.

Open Microsoft Flow. The Flow icon should be available in your Office 365 App Launcher if you have the licence enabled (alternatively you can just go to the website).

Search the templates for “Twitter”, and select the “Save tweets to an Excel file” template.

Microsoft Flow Templates

You will then be required to login to Twitter and Excel. When logging into Excel, make sure that you sign into OneDrive for Business with the correct account (otherwise you will get unauthorised access when trying to add rows). When both services are signed in, press continue.

Twitter trigger

In the twitter trigger, add the twitter account name to the search text box. This will fire off the process when that account tweets.

Excel action

In the insert row action, find the tweets excel spreadsheet in your OneDrive for Business by using the folder icon. The table will appear automatically under the Table name drop down. You can then select each column and add the appropriate tweet field.

Save the Flow and check that it is enabled.

In twitter, send a tweet from your account.

Twitter tweet

The Flow will run every 60 seconds, you can check the runs by clicking on the “i” icon next to the Flow and then filtering by “Checks (no data)”. After a couple of minutes, your spreadsheet should be updated with the tweet data!

Excel populated with tweets from MS Flow



Creating a picture library slideshow using jQuery Cycle2 and the SharePoint framework

In this post, I wanted to show how you can modify the SharePoint framework Hello World web part and add other custom JavaScript libraries to create a simple slideshow.

spfx

Prerequisites

I’m going to start my tutorial after following these steps:

Setup SharePoint Tenant
Setup your machine
HelloWorld WebPart
HelloWorld, Talking to SharePoint

Once that is all working fine, you should have something that looks like this:

spfx-slideshow01

Note: In the solution below, I have removed some of the HTML rendered in the SolutionNameWebPart.ts file (optional):

this.domElement.innerHTML = `
<div class="${styles.solutionName}">
  <div class="${styles.container}">
    <div id="spListContainer" />
  </div>
</div>`;

Pull in images from SharePoint picture library

Create a picture library in your SharePoint site called “Slideshow”. Upload a couple of images into this library for testing purposes.

Inside your project, open up SolutionNameWebPart.ts (found inside your WebPart folder). Change the REST API call so that the picture library item URLs are fetched. Currently the REST query (found in the _getListData function) is pulling list and library names, change it to:

this.context.pageContext.web.absoluteUrl + "/_api/web/lists/GetByTitle('slideshow')/Items?$select=EncodedAbsUrl"

This will return the picture library item URLs.

Add the EncodedAbsUrl as a string to the ISPList object:

export interface ISPList {
  Title: string;
  Id: string;
  EncodedAbsUrl: string;
}

In the “_renderList” function, change the item loop to this:

items.forEach((item: ISPList) => {
   html += `<img src="${item.EncodedAbsUrl}" alt="image" />`;
});

This will now use the EncodedAbsUrl as the image location. Running this using gulp serve should now show the images from the picture library. You may want to add in some mock data for local tests.

spfx-slideshow02

Making it responsive

The images are rendered at their actual size. Some CSS is required to make the images responsive. Add the class ${styles.cdbImage} to the image tag.

html += `<img src="${item.EncodedAbsUrl}" class="${styles.cdbImage}" alt="image" />`;

Open the SolutionName.module.scss file and add the following code inside the last brace.

.cdbImage{width:100%;height:auto;}

Serve the files again and the images will now be responsive.

spfx-slideshow03

Adding jQuery and Cycle2

Download using Node Package Manager

When adding common JavaScript libraries to projects, Node Package Manager is an excellent tool to quickly bundle items. Run the following nodeJS package manager commands:

npm install jquery

npm install jquery-cycle-2

Two extra folders are now created under “node_modules”.

Install TypeScript definitions

In order to use these libraries in TypeScript, a definition file is required for IntelliSense and compilation. jQuery can be added via the TypeScript definition tool in the nodeJS command line:

tsd install jquery –save

jQuery Cycle2 is not available via this command line but can be downloaded from here:

Github jQuery TypeScript

Download it and add it to a new folder called jquerycycle under the “typings” folder. The typings folder contains all the TypeScript definition files. jQuery has automatically been added here. However we need to manually add the Cycle2 definition.

In the root of the typings folder, open the file named tsd.d.ts. This file controls all the definitions which are used in the project. jQuery has already been added, manually add a new line for jQuery Cycle2.

/// <reference path="jquery/jquery.d.ts" />
/// <reference path="jquerycycle/jquery.cycle.d.ts" />

Add libraries to project

Open the config.json file (under the config folder) in the project. This lists all the external references. jQuery and Cycle2 need to be added here so they can be used in the project. In the “externals” section, add:

 "jquery": "node_modules/jquery/dist/jquery.js",
 "jquery-cycle": "node_modules/jquery-cycle-2/src/jquery.cycle.all.js"
 

The libraries can now be included in the project. Go back to the solutionNameWebPart.ts file and add:

import * as myjQuery from 'jquery';
require('jquery-cycle');
 

The object myjQuery should be a unique name for your project to avoid conflicts. jQuery cycle is added using require as it has a dependency on jQuery.

At the end of the _renderList function in the web part class, add the following code to initialise the slideshow:

myjQuery( document ).ready(function() {
    myjQuery('#spListContainer').cycle();
});
 

Refreshing the page, should now give you a responsive slideshow.

spfx

How to setup a class in Microsoft Classroom

In the video below, I go through the simple steps of setting up a class in Microsoft Classroom. It’s straightforward but does require teachers to manually setup and keep class membership up-to-date. Third party integration to MIS databases will be available soon in the UK (hopefully). In the meantime you can use a similar assignment system called Teacher Dashboard which has the option of syncing AD and Office 365 groups.

Microsoft Classroom is a great out-of-the-box product but doesn’t allow much customisation so you may want to think about some custom class and subject sites as part of your portal. Please feel free to contact us for a demo of these at Cloud Design Box.



SharePoint Consultancy and Services

Cloud Design Box

A few months ago, I started a new SharePoint consultancy business. I will continue to add blog posts here but you can contact me directly for any of the following Microsoft SharePoint and Office 365 services by clicking here:

  • Responsive design and branding
  • Site architecture planning and implementation
  • Workflow and consultancy services
  • SharePoint upgrades
  • Office 365 configuration
  • SharePoint Support
  • Scripting and client object model solutions

We provide these services for education and for business. Please visit the website for more information www.clouddesignbox.co.uk